1975 DAY-BY-DAY

All the pictures shown on this page are identified with the correct date when the informations are available. All the credits are given to the original owner.

Despite the corrections, if errors exist please send me a email (you will be cited as corrector).

JANUARY 1975

A contemporary session of « A Noce Pair » release was carried out but remained partly unused. Photographies by BARRIE WENTZELL.

On 11 January 1975 The Beebs Broadcasts the 1974 Wembley show (only the « Dark Side of the Moon » set)

Extract from « Sounds » (5 January 1975)

The same day, « New Musical Express » publishes an interview with David Gilmour who replies to the attacks of the group are the object.

Nick Kent:

« On 14 November 1974, approximately seven thousand people washed their hair and traveled down to the Empire Pool, Wembley, to witness the Pink Floyd live. Almost everyone, that is, except David Gilmour: his hair looked filthy there on stage, seemingly anchored down by a surfeit of scalp grease and tapering off below the shoulders with a spectacular festooning of split ends » - , in the 

« New Musical Express », November 1974


Gilmour: 

« When I'm standing there I'm conscious of trying to give the most I can. And I don't need to have clean hair for that » 

« Dirty hair denied », New Musical Express, January 1975

21 January 1975, first recording sessions with  Shine on at the EMI Studios.

Session with David for the second part of the track. Photography by Phil TAYLOR.

1st February 1975 « A nice pair » is certified gold by the BPI (for more 150,000 sales).

The sessions for the follow-up of « The Dark Side of the Moon » are pretty difficult. Latent tensions within the band takes reality..


Waters:

«We were there, four poor lost souls, waiting God knows who or whatever (...) . I was the only one to offer pieces, which at least one should have pleasing Dave since he brought a beautiful chord sequence: You gotta be crazy. But Nick and Rick didn’t like it: too rough, too personal... Well, then why we should to be here, if both of us wants to make music and two other less ?».

«Interview w/. Philippe Constantin», June 1976.


Waters : 

«It was a horrible time. We were all fighting like cats and dogs. We were finally realising - or accepting, if you like - that there was no band. It was really being thrust upon us that we were not a band and had not been in accord for a long time. Not since 1975, when we made Wish You Were Here. Even then there were big disagreements about content and how to put the record together».

«Interview with Chris Salewicz», Q Magazine, June 1987.

Waters : 

« I wanted to take drastic measures, either by laying down arms right away, at the top of our carrer so to speak ; either by go out of the crisis by the top, which mean to work twice as. There, of course , a secret fear has emerged, hand in hand with the stinginess : no question of break up when money coming like never before! Hence tensions, unspoken compromise: it would therefore continue without enthusiasm and at the cost of internal damages (...) It was a sickening sadness. I would have preferred a big fat conflict, it is in my nature ... but not in that of Dave who, as the musician he is, from all his bones, immersed himself in his guitar as if he would breaks this burden os sadness ».

« Interview w/. Philippe Constantin », June 1976.

FEBRUARY 1975

Following the group during the « British Winter Tour », in the fall of 1974, Sedgwick and Storm Thorgeson present their manuscript entitled « In the Pink », the first real biography on the band (it will eventually released in an altered dorm many years later). Waters is satisfied by the work, Gilmour much less ...


Waters:

« We all sat down and read it, and it was fascinating. Dave read it and said « yeah » and then just a couple of days later, he just exploded. He started saying things like « if this is true then i might as well not be in the band » because it didn't fit with how he talk of himself and his role in the band. It described me as the leader. So, the whole book was suppressed »


Storm Thorgerson:

« (...) it does display the dynamic in the group at that time. I had tapes of certain discussions, some arguments. At times, people perhaps said things they wished they hadn't »

« Pigs might fly », Mark Blake, 2006


Gilmour denied this incident ... confirmed nonetheless by Waters, Storm and Nicholas Schaffner in his book « A Saucerful of Secrets ».


Waters :

« (…) But I have to say Dave did some great work as well after « Dark Side ». His contributions to those latter records were very important (...) ».

« The Man Behind Pink Floyd's The Wall », Greg Knot, 1999.

MARCH 1975

On his March issue, « Rock and Folk » announces that David Gilmour will appear on the new Harper LP.

March 1975, many musical magazine announces the next Pink Floyd tour and the new LP for April …


Steve O'Rourke:

«(The group) has four or five things that they're going to do differently. It will a big, overpowering show, really massive»

« Sounds », 23 March 1975.

Special pop in the comic magazine « Tintin l’heddoptimiste » on 25 March 1975 (France)

APRIL 1975

Roger on the American golf courses during Spring.

April 1975: Frederick Bannister announces officially the participation of the band to the Knebworth Festival planned on July.

« Melody Maker » (left) and « New Musical Express » (right), , 19 April 1975.

7 April the band take Panam 125 from London at 1:10pm to Seattle for transit. The band took the fly to Vancouver who take off at 4:50pm

US Itinerary sheet

On the eve of their US Tour, Rolling Stone sent a reporter to follow the band but the magazine are some struggle with the rest of the band when it appears the members don’t want give some interviews


Waters:

« The Rolling Stone is just about selling records now. When we were in no position to sell their paper for them, they didn't want to know about us. I don't read this paper »

« The New Rock Messiahs », NT, 30 April 1975

8 April 1975 Pacific National Exhibition Coliseum, Vancouver, Canada

Jeani Read (Rock Critic):

« There was, indeed, a time sometime when heavy, amorphous, out-tripping concerts- head music?- were a significant force in rock. There was also a time sometime when Pink Floyd were an extraordinary band to listen to, live (…) But what Pink Floyd is doing now is painfully anachronistic besides being insufferably boring (…) 

What was billed as some kind of sound and light show visitation turned out to be more cosmic turkey than cosmic circus. Pink Floyd could possibly still write some decent score for general entertainment sci-fi flicks »

« This day in Vancouver: April 8th », The Dependent, 8 April 2012

10 April 1975 Seattle Center Coliseum, Seattle, USA

Photographies by Mike Leach.

12 April 1975 The Cow Palace, Daly City, San Francisco, USA

Photographies by Larry SCHORR.

Alex Woodman (audience member):

« Early in 1975, the ads for the forthcoming Pink Floyd concerts at The Cow Palace in San Francisco appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle.  Scraping together every last penny I could, I bought as many tickets to both nights as I could afford. Pink Floyd were by far my favourite band ever since a friend played One of These Days for me back in 1971. Now I was finally going to get a chance to see them. Both days I arrived with my friends at One in the afternoon for the 8pm show. (I had to be right up front!) Fortunately, there was a small line of great people ahead of us and we enjoyed the “trip” until the show started. The fog slowly creeping down on us from San Bruno Mountain was a nice effect also.

The doors finally opened and once inside we found ourselves buying copies of Pink Floyd comics. We then rushed up and sat about 20 feet from the stage. Looking around, we noticed that there were stacks of speakers on either side of the auditorium and a stack in the back. Nick Mason’s drum kit had the ‘ocean wave’ design on it. Looking through the comic book, we noticed words to songs we’ve never heard before - Raving and Drooling, You Gotta Be Crazy and Shine On You Crazy Diamond. Eight o’clock came and went and it wasn’t until about 8:20 that the band finally came out. It was told by a local DJ with a backstage pass that Mr. Gilmour had purchased a pinball machine and was playing the free game he won on it! The lights went down and without a word they started into Raving and Drooling (Sheep), followed by You Gotta Be Crazy (Dogs) and then Shine On You Crazy Diamond. The first two songs lasted about 10 minutes each with Shine On clocking in at least a half an hour long. At the end of Shine On, a mirrored flower rose from behind the band with its mirrored petals rotating in one direction and mirrored center rotating in the opposite direction. How incredible to hear new music that was to come out on the next two albums live for the first time! After the break, the boys came out to do Dark Side in its entirety. The quad system was fantastic and we were all totally blown away. We knew we were in for a treat when the heartbeat started up. The crashing plane at the end of On the Run scared the shit out of me as I didn’t notice it until it was right on top of me! For an encore, we were treated to a great rendition of Echoes with some saxophone added to the middle of the jam. Dry ice mist came cascading off the stage into the crowd while green lights were reflecting on it. All I could see at this point were a bunch of heads sticking out of this green fog. We all thought it was a great combination to go along with the high-pitched screams coming from Gilmour’s guitar. One guy started yelling, « I can’t breathe! » and climbed up onto the stage. Waters slowly backed away from him when one of the stage crew quickly appeared from behind the drum set and hit the guy like a cornerback sending him flying back into the crowd. He disappeared into the fog. The show ended  with the chorus of voices rising higher and higher, then softly fading away. Both shows were great and unforgettable. I am really glad I went as it was the only chance I had to see the Floyd as a foursome »

« Brain Damage » #37

13 April 1975 The Cow Palace, Daly City, San Francisco, USA

« The two Pink Floyd concerts here April 12 and 13 were more successful as true multi-media experiences than as music. The first show was a sellout, the second nearly so, and the Floyd received much adulation from the crowds, who were dazzled by such things as the group's spinning mirrored wheel, a missile that shot from the rear of the auditorium over the startled heads of the crowd and disappeared into the recesses behind the stage; loud explosions and vast amounts of smoke; a large circular screen upon which a continuous barrage of quickly shifting images were played, and a sleek quadraphonic system that gave a truly exciting and enveloping dimensionality to the sound. Nonetheless, the music itself was often tedious. The Floyd played a three-hour show (there was no supporting act) with a 20-30 minute intermission. The first segment featured some new material; the second half was mostly selections from « Dark Side Of The Moon ». The lengthy encore was Echoes. The group was accompanied by two female backing voices and a saxophone player, who added welcome depth. The group is doing a series of six West Coast dates (including four nights, April 23-26 at the Los Angeles Sports Arena, for which all 56,000 tickets sold in one day) and then will lay off until June, when its long-delayed new Columbia LP is expected. They will then play the major cities of the Midwest and East. The Columbia LP will be its first for that label, to which they were signed by Clive Davis shortly before he was dismissed by the CBS hierarchy. Capitol, however, is realizing profits from the tour; « Dark Side » recorded for that company two years ago. is back on the charts again »

« Talent in Action », Billboard, 5 March 1975


«Before a capacity crowd at the Cow Palace last Saturday, Pink Floyd proved what its devoted fans have asserted for years — that it is one of the top rock groups in the world. Since the band's inception in the mid-60s, it has been one of the foremost exponents of what was often derogatorily classified as "head" or "space" music. 

Although the group produced a number of excellent albums and was quite innovative (especially in the use of special sound effects and unique guitar parts), it received little recognition. However, Pink Floyd's 1973 album «Dark Side Of The Moon» received much radio playing time, and the group's popularity ballooned. Nonetheless, despite this success, Pink Floyd had not toured the United States since early autumn of 1972. Gilmour Supports While percussionist Nick Mason, keyboard man Richard Wright and particularly bassist-lyricist Roger Waters are all very talented musicians, guitarist David Gilmour provides the real backbone in Pink Floyd's music. In fact, Gilmour probably deserves to be ranked among the world's top guitarists. He does not possess the quickness of a John McLaughlin or an Eric Clapton,

yet compensates by playing with incredible precision and tone quality. In his unique style, Gilmour produces notes of remarkable clarity and distinctness, notes which have a particular "ringing" quality about them. 

Such a style permits Gilmour to play very loudly without being obtrusive or painful to the ear.  The concert opened with a selection from the group's new album, to be released in June. This first number, "Raving and Drooling," was in the best Pink Floyd tradition, featuring a prominent bass part by Waters and strong work by Wright on organ and synthesizer. The next two songs the group performed demonstrated their

musical versatility.  The first, "Gotta Be Crazy," evinced a heavy jazz-blues influence, and included an excellent bit of blues guitar work by Gilmour. This jazz-blues motif, not often found on previous Pink Floyd albums, likely marks a new trend which the band will follow in the near future. At one point, Gilmour shifted to pedal steel guitar, a new medium for him, yet one which he handled extremely well, reaching the highest notes accurately and with no distortion. Following a short break, Pink Floyd played all of Dark Side Of The Moon in a most impressive fashion. Even when the group played furiously, the various elements comprising the music did not clash, but blended into an harmonious whole. 

The highlight of this set was the group's extended version of "Money," featuring some scintillating work by Gilmour at his clear, ringing best, and a solid performance on saxophone by Dick Parry, who joined the group for the second half of the concert. Vocalists Vanetta Field and Carlena Williams also appeared for this second set, enriching the music considerably with their strong and precise vocal backing. 

On "The Great Gig In The Sky" their voices added an almost celestial quality to the music. This half of the concert utilized a film presentation which was well integrated with the music. For instance, at the beginning of the song "Time," the film showed hundreds of clocks passing in the sky, and finally a massive pendulum clock receding into the sun. Symbolic Satire And for "Money" the film satirized the pervasive importance of money by displaying symbols of the things money can allegedly buy, including power, progress, and love. Although most people in the audience were happy with what Pink Floyd played, they were somewhat disappointed that the group did not play longer. Certainly this was the one weakness of the concert. But the fans at the Cow Palace had to settle for a three-hour concert and hope that Pink Floyd would not wait another two-and-a-half years before returning to the U.S »

«Pink Floyd Sound Blasts Cow Palace», The Stanford Daily, 18 April 1975

15 April 1975 University Activity Center, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA (rescheduled to 20.04.1975)

17 April 1975 Denver Coliseum, Denver, CO, USA

«Nobody just up and puts on a Pink Floyd concert, man. It takes preparation. Like, lots of preparation. And a little help from your friends in the fire department.

Any group that hits town with 600 pounds of dry ice, tiers of liquid oxygen bottles and enough flash powder to run Matthew Brady’s Civil War photo studio for the duration of the conflict just isn't in town to pick a little guitar. They are here to put on a SHOW, man. With, like, literally tons of electronic equipment screaming in quadraphonic sound while a giant screen behind them fills with filmed outrage as an elaborate light show explodes all around and tiny airplanes sail through the air.

That’s why the Community Center people have spent the last few days building this enormous black, super-reinforced stage that covers nearly half the Arena floor and is so strong that every square foot of stage space can supposedly support over 5W pounds of Pink Floyd gear. That’s heavy. 

And Saturday night at 8 p.m. when Pink Floyd mounts the stage, protected from the crowd by a 4-foot-tall plywood barrier, and flips the switch that sends a blast of wiremelting voltage crashing through all those speakers — 10 extra fire extinguishers and two fire blankets will be standing in the ready. That’s a Pink Floyd concert. Man »

Source unknow

19 April 1975 Tucson Community Center Arena, Tuscon, USA

Photography by P. K. Weis

« Every single seat was taken and the crowd of 10,000 in the Tucson Community Center Arena was roaring, stomping and whistling in ecstatic anticipation as Pink Floyd, one of Britain’s most durable bands, came onstage Saturday night for the group’s three-hour set. Dynamic innovators, the Pink Floyd organization was determined from the start to dazzle Tucson with a lavish $9,000 electronic and pyrotechnic display.

The Floyd, as their fans refer to them, recorded their first material, "Relics" in 1967 with the aid of mastermind Syd Barrett, who later quit the group and was committed to a mental institution.

The memory of Barrett pave Floyd the courage and inspiration to stick together and carry on for eight years, five albums and scores of concerts. The foursome started out Saturday night with a new composition, ‘‘Raving and Drooling.”” The band uses themes of insanity and paranoia in their lyrics and combines them with a slow, mesmerizing beat, innovative electronics and neurotic visual wizardry.

The first half of the concert consisted of tunes from a new release. Lights glared on Nick Mason's cymbals and a strobe flickered in his drum set. Towers of multicolored lights luminated the 4,800-square-foot stage, specially built for this concert. 

David Gilmour’s rich guitar tones and silky mellotron work by Richard Wright preceded some wild lead guitar and VCS3 synthesizer parts. Roger Waters, on bass, sang a blues number, and Wright and Gilmour joined in on some ethereal three-part harmony. The leisurely, peaceful pace underwent a subtle speedup as a giant circular saw began whirling behind the band. As the Floyd finished their last song before a 15-minute intermission, the blade suddenly stopped and the lights faded, leaving the blade to twinkle and sparkle in the darkness.

During the break, the crowd threw frisbees and sparklers. Then, a sound heartbeat sound filed the arena, and a film clip of a police car pulling up with siren blaring and blue lights spinning and flashing, appeared on a screen behind the stage. The concertgoers were getting their $8.50's worth. In mid-1972, in their last Tucson appearance, The Floyd played late ’60s material from the "Ummagumma" and ‘Meddle” LPs. Saturday night they piayed the entire "Dark Side of the Moon" album, which is "70s stuff.

On the screen was a film of a hospital hallway, with masked white-robed "doctors" clutching butcher knives.  Then came a circling light, a giant brown eye, geometric rainbow patterns and photos of Earth taken from outer space. The speakers played synthesized helicopter and breathing sounds. "I’ve always been mad", a taped voice said, as The Floyd launched into "Breathe". Their futuristic filmed light show continued with a plane taking off, an orange flash, and whirling discs.

Loud VCS3 synthesizer marked the start of "On the Run” as spotlights flickered through the crowd. A giant airplane, floating magically on invisible guy wires above the throng’s head, passed the stage, smashed into the wall, and exploded into flash-powder flames with a convincing “Whoomph!"" The 10,000 fans roared their approval.

Now flames were shown on the screen, then spinning clocks. The quadrophonic System sent eerie waves of sound through every corner of the arena. The group was playing "Time" with the aid of two great femaie vocalists, Vanetta Field and Carlena Willtams. The Floyd then played a "Breathe" (reprise), while on the screen was a lava flow and crashing surf. "Great Gig in the Sky", the next number, was highlighted by precise, powerful background vocals. On the screen were pyramids, gold coins and a slot machine as the amplifiers issued taped effects of slot machines and clinking coin sounds. The group played their 45 bullet, "Money", which sold over two million copies. 

David Gilmour led the song with his hoarse vocals. Dick Parry was featured on electric sax during the break, and strobes lit up the stage. Films included footage of Kissinger, Nixon, mushroom clouds, massive explosions, old men, a flashing emergency sign, a symphony conductor, Fidel Castro speaking, a whirling tunnel, George Wallace, a rainbow and Arabs. Taped church bells tolled as the group left the stage. The Floyd waited a full minute for the applause and loud cheering and whistling to reach a crescendo. The standing ovation built up to a fever pitch as thousands lit matches.

Pink Floyd returned for a rousing encore, "Echoes", which is a 10 minute song from an older album, "Meddle". They were surrounded by hip-high green fog created by liquid nitrogen and dry ice. Confetti-like “snow” drifted down from the ceiling. The band owes a lot to its five-man lighting crew, two projectionists, eight sound technicians, an intercom specialist and sound mixer extraordinaire Brian Humphries. A portion of the crowd of 10,000 that was treated by the Pink Floyd to music, noise. pyrotechnics, movies — in general, a wild Saturday night in tho Community Center Arena. One of the gimmick was a giant whirling saw"

« 10,000 fans roar approvals of Pink Floyd », Tucson Daily Citizen, 21 April 1975

20 April 1975 University Active Center, Tempe, USA

« It’s easy to see why the group use these gimmicks. Including the 10-foot airplane model which went crashing into the stage in time with music.

The crowd liked it and that should be reason enough. But I think the crowd is wrong. A light show is a good addition to most rock shows, but when special effects his are carried to the extreme they can only detract from the music and create a carnival atmosphere. The music was good enough to outweigh the gimmicks, however. Pink Floyd came on strong when they played many of the songs on « Dark side at the Moon », and the group was called back for an encore. They then played Echoes, a song which covers the entire second side of their album « Meddle ».

Applause was enthusiastic for the old material and it seemed to help. The four musicians are not fantastic and they don't claim to be. But they have an unique style which buoys the audience’s emotions with soothing notes, then jars the ears with loud explosions or quick paced tilts. Nick Mason kept good time with his 15-piece drum set. Keyboards man Rick Wright played with inspiration. Lead guitarist Dave Gilmore did an excellent job on the slow mellow notes he's known for but lacked proficiency on his faster work. Roger Waters, the leading influence on the group was the best performer. His bass guitar playing left little to be desired. And let it be said that their 32 tons of equipment was enough.My ears were ringing (or hours after the show) ».

« Gimmickry detracts from excellent show », Ash State Press, 22 April 1975.


« Pink Floyd are pro genitors of musical force, creating an alloy that melds lyrics, rhythms and space-age technology o a cohesive science fiction odyssey. Like a drop of Binaca the Floyd’s active ingredients cleanse the audio smegma we are used to hearing on AM and, even occasionally on FM radio. More than 2 tons of equipment enough t" 'toll three semitrailer rigs became the life line and support system which linked the Floyd the audience and outer space in a symbiotic relationship of time sharing harmony.

The Phoenix concert was split into two parts, the first segment dealing with new material. The last composition of the first half, entitled "Shine on Crazy Diamond," made use of the first piece of theatrical staging in the form of a pinwheel-like mosaic of mirrors that was raised, through telescopic leg supports, thirty feet above the stage Lights from the rear of the room were concentrated on the 15 foot diameter plane and, as the convex center began to rotate. the Activities Center at A.S.U was bathed in bundles of reflected light It was like being transported into the Milky Way; the dimension of time was absent.

The second half was even better. The Floyd played every cul from their supersonic smash album. « The Dark Side of the Moon ». The multimedia presentation went into orbit and off we went into the stratosphere (and the noosphere, for that matter !).

Projected from the rear of a 50-foot diameter screen was a film which ran intermittently during the album A stainless steel airplane, controlled by pulley and cable hurtled from one corner of the arena In the stage before crashing into heavy padding The explosion that followed sent shocks through the entire building. The Floyd timed this action precisely with the explosions.

After the sun was eclipsed by the moon, the Floyd performed "Echoes," from the Meddle" album, for an encore. During this composition a large volume of liquid nitrogen was released on stage, creating a dense fog »

« Pink Floyd lives to tell about him », New Times, 21 April 1975

21 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

Photographies by Gary GAMACHE

« More than 200 persons were arrested during the two nights of the performance of the English rock group Pink Floyd at the Sports Arena, police said today. Most of the arrests were on drug related charges. Six persons, however, were charged with scalping tickets.

More than 14,000 persons attended the performance Thursday night and officers, in uniform and plain clothes, circulated through the crowd »

« 200 Arrested At Rock Show », Desert Sun, 25 April 1975


« Opening night of what had been originally planned as a three night gig, then upped to four, and then to five, as tickets sold just about as fast as they could be made available.

Sometimes you go to a concert to clap along and feel happy, sometimes to experience the bizarre, sometimes to because you're really into the artist and his music; people go to Pink Floyd concerts for a religious experience. I'm sure the lady next to me either saw God or a perfectly acceptable stand-in. It was that kind of show.

It's not an easy task for a group to totally dominate a space the size of the Sports Arena, but thanks to one of the most impressively arranged and performed total shows I've ever seen, Pink Floyd pulled it off.

We all know the brand of music; long, spacey bridges with lots of sustain from the keyboards and lots of novel effects thrown in for us to think about while being led to the next jam. The music builds constantly, not just within numbers but from the opening audio hum of the amps to the final notes of the concert. Essentially the entire show is one piece of music.

The climax comes of course in "Dark Side Of The Moon." I've seen other groups run a theme song into the ground simply by overworking a dead horse. Not so in this case. Each time I hear this number it has new dimensions. I've heard it said that a "classic" can be recognized in art when its theme and style are timeless, mark then, this music is such.

The effects, lighting, mixing, and "specials" were right up to the music. The theme was power - power in size, power in decibles, and power in color. It was all done with consumate artistry.

Some groups try to bowl you over with lots of effects and trust to random luck for it to all blend together. Pink Floyds’ crew deserves a note of their own.

Anytime you can take a giant circularmovie screen with a full scale motion picture running, a dazzling rotating mirror arrangement, the banks of color -lights, and the old fog, blend it to such music as Floyds' and have it fit and fit well, you've done something »

« Pink Floyd », Cash Box, 3 May 1975

22 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

Photographies by Michael OGHS

23 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

Photography by Annie LEBOWITZ

24 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

25 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

Photographies by TLL and Jeffrey MAYER

26 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

27 April 1975 Sports Arena, San Diego, USA

56,000 tickets were sold in one day for these 6 nights-run gigs and a total of 511 fans were arrested for possession of Marijuana during these 5 shows

MAY 1975

Photographies by Nick MASON

Early May, the recording sessions continue at EMI Studios for a complete month.


Waters : 

« It was a horrible time. We were all fighting like cats and dogs. We were finally realising - or accepting, if you like - that there was no band. It was really being thrust upon us that we were not a band and had not been in accord for a long time. Not since 1975, when we made Wish You Were Here. Even then there were big disagreements about content and how to put the record together».

« Interview with Chris Salewicz », Q Magazine, June 1987.

Photographies by Jill FURMANOVSKY.

Interviewer : « Did the prospect pf having to follow the huge success of « Dark Side of the Moon » create a lot of pressure on you during the sessions for « Wish you Were Here » ? » 

Gilmour: « Yeah, that's what the album's about, I think - as far as Roger's concerned, anyway. It's about that feeling we were left with at the end of Dark Side - that feeling of « What do you do when you've done everything ? » But I think we got over that »

« David Gilmour », Guitar World, February 1993.

Photographies by Jill FURMANOVSKY and Nick MASON

Gilmour : 

« (...) There were three long tracks, including Shine On You Crazy Diamond, which I wanted to record, and Roger said, No, let’s take Shine On, divide it into two, and put in other material around the same theme. And he was right, I was wrong ».

« The Third Coming », Mojo Magazine, May 1994.

Photographies by Jill FURMANOVSKY and Nick MASON

« Wish you were here » test pressing

On May, two Italian music magazines dedicate their whole issue to the band with an exclusive interview

« Concert Promotions International will attempt to set a new world record gate for a group appearance when Pink Floyd appear at Hamilton’s Ivor Wynn Stadium on June 28th. The promoters are printing 60,000 tickets and if they sell out, it will surpass the Shea Stadium gig of the Beatles »

« Canada », CashBox, 10 May 1975

Interviewer : « (…) What is your reaction when you see this picture of 1975 ».

Gilmour : « Nice picture. It would have been a good time, isn’t it ? It’s easy to think there was never quite brotherhood between us or moments of joy after all these fights during the last twenty years. We had some pretty good times often. All of us. We lived and breathed Pink Floyd and were ... pals ... in some way ».

« Gilmour : Full of Secrets », Guitar Part, December 2006.

May 1975, Stephane Grappeli and Yehudi Mehunin are recording At EMI Studios, Studio 2. David Gilmour ask to the both if he could collaborate to the Wish you were here track. The second later declines. The track would be unreleased until the release of the « Immersion » boxset.


Nick Mason:

« It still astonishes me that we didn't use it originally, didn't realise what a wonderful thing it was. We were recording in studio three and Yehudi and Stephane were recording in two. They were invited in to hear what we were working on »

Under pressure, Roger Waters lived a curious experience who was partly an inspiration for the Comfortably Numb lyric: « you have no pain, you are receding ».


Roger Waters:

« It comes from 1974 or 1975 in the canteen at the EMI studios, and I was with the band eating dinner in the middle of a recording session and looking down the table and suddenly the whole scene looked as if I was looking at it through a pair of binoculars the wrong way. And I went ‘Oh, this is not good ‘. This is what having a nervous breakdown must feel like. I thought … and I remember standing up and somehow making my way up the stairs and going into number three studio where there was a piano. And I sat and started playing the piano and slowly it came back again. But it was the scariest thing. A really, really strong, solid hallucination, visual hallucination. And I though, ‘God, I’m going mad’ » »

« The making of Pink Floyd The Wall », Gerald Scarfe, 2010

On 16 May, Roy Harper is invited to provide lead vocal on Have a Cigar.


Waters:

« I tell you why I think it was. It was because... I'd already started singing Shine On and it is right at the edge of my range. I always felt very insecure about singing anyway because I'm not naturally able to sing well. I find it very difficult to pitch notes right, and the whole thing's really difficult for me. I know what I wanna do but I don't have the ability to do it well, so I feel very insecure about it anyway, and I'd just been doing a lot on Shine On and it is right on the edge of my range and it was incredibly difficult and fantastically boring to record, 'cos I had to do it line by line, doing it over and over and over again just to get it sounding reasonable. I suppose... there are several reasons why I did it rather than Dave (…).

So anyway I was feeling very down about singing and very insecure about it anyway, and when Have A Cigar came up Roy was recording in the studio anyway, and was in and out all the time, and I can't remember who suggested he did it - maybe I did, probably hoping everybody would go "ooh no Rog, YOU do it!" but they didn't! They all went "Oh yeah, that's a good idea". And he did it and everybody went "Oh, terrific!" So that was that.

I think it was a bad idea now. I think I should've done it. Not that he did it badly. I think he did it very well. It just isn't us anymore (...) »

« Your Mother didn’like this ! », Capital Radio, December 1976.

Pictures by Adrian BOOT

JUNE 1975

« Photo-Journal », First June 1975

On 5 June, Syd made an apparition to the EMI Studios during the recording of « Wish you were here ».


Interviewer: « There is a popular Syd story that he actually turned up unannounced at the mixing session for Shine On You Crazy Diamond and said he was ready to do my bit »

Gilmour: «He showed up at the studio. He was very fat and he had a shaved head and shaved eyebrows [note Bob Geldof's eyebrow-shaving scene in The Wall] and no one recognized him at all first off.  There was just this strange person walking around the studio, sitting in the control room with us for hours.  If anyone else told me this story, I'd find it hard to believe, that you could sit there with someone in a small room for hours, with a close friend of yours for years and years, and not recognize him. And I guarantee, no one in the band recognized him. Eventually, I had guessed it. And even knowing, you couldn't recognize him. He came two or three days and then he didn't come anymore».

«Pink Floyd», Musician, December 1982


Wright:

«One thing that really stands out in my mind, that I’ll never forget; I was going in to the the Shine On sessions. I went in the studio and I saw this guy sitting at the back of the studio, he was only as far away as you are from me. And I didn’t recognise him.  I said, ‘Who’s that guy behind you?’ ‘That’s Syd.’ And I just cracked up, I couldn’t believe it …  he had shaven all his hair off… I mean, his eyebrows, everything… he was jumping up and down brushing his teeth, it was awful. And, uh, I was in, I mean Roger was in tears, I think I was; we were both in tears. It was very shocking… seven years of no contact and then to walk in while we’re actually doing that particular track. I don’t know – coincidence, karma, fate, who knows? But it was very, very, very powerful»

«Special Pink Floyd», VH1, 1996.


The « come-back » of Syd open new speculation about a new album with the ex-founding member


« Stories, you see, have once again been circulating concerning first of all the rather bizarre reunion betwixt the Pink Floyd and their Founding 

Father at E.M.I.’s Abbey Road studios, where the former were to be found working on the final mixes of « Wish You Were Here » One source for example claims that a "very together” Barrett helped out on the mixing of “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, while innumerable other accounts — without the luxury of any real details — still feel it necessary to inject a quotient of hearty rejoicing that Syd was back with “his band” insinuating ever-so-tenuously that this might presage « a return to activity ». We-e-ell. The real facts concerning this reunion are pretty much as follows. The Floyd were setting about their mixing in, one presumes, their usual workmanlike fashion, when Barrett suddenly appeared, wandering into proceedings as if such an appearance warranted not one dint of surprise to be registered »

« Is it possible that … », New Musical Express, September 1975


Brian Humphries:

«He apparently walked into the studio before coming into the control room, but I never saw that,” says Brian Humphries who would subsequently engineer Pink Floyd’s 1977 album, Animals. “Maybe I was talking and didn’t notice. Either way, the doors opened, in came this fat, bald figure wearing a white trench coat, and he just stood there while we all looked around at each other. Then David said, ‘Alright, Syd?’ and we couldn’t believe it»

«Pink Floyd’s Shine on you crazy diamond», soundonsound.com, December 2014.

Syd, photographied by Nick MASON

« CashBox » (18 October 1975), « New Musical Express » (15 November 1975), « Opel »

Halfway through their 1975 American tour, Pink Floyd decided to get a giant pyramid to support their stage set. They got one built in a great rush, during a four-week break in the middle of the tour. It stood 20 meters (66 feet) square, and 20 meters high.


Mason:

«During June 1975 we had returned to America on tour. We were trying to incorporate more and more complex effects. Of these, the inflatable pyramid was perhaps our most spectacular disaster. Roger, drawing on the architectural education the British taxpayer had kindly funded, had conceived a pyramid-shaped stage with an inflatable roof, thus solving all the design problems of the size of stage we required as well as providing protection from the weather at the same time. We applauded his vision, and thought it would look marvelous. The icing on the cake was, that as a climax to the show, the pyramid would gracefully ascend into the heavens on the end of a rope cable, delighting the assembled multitude below. Roger’s design demanded pillars at each of the four corners reaching over forty feel high, a base size of some six hundred square feet (the size of a decent house), an overall height of eighty feet and a volume of helium sufficient for a Zeppelin. The slightest breath of wind would set the entire structure shuddering and wobbling in a manner not dissimilar to the way London’s Millennium Bridge flexed when it was first opened.  The first show was in Atlanta, where the strength of the wind was outside our safety parameters and sufficient for the whole thing to fail (…)»

«Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd», Nick Mason, 2005


Interviewer: «Now, previously, you had mentioned the pyramid. The original pyramid that Pink Floyd had had constructed in 1975, was a 66 ft. square, 66 foot high inflatable that was to be used during their tour of the US. The top, looking like the pyramid on a US bank note, was to detach and float away, however the first time it was used the balloon in the top half escaped, and the pyramid crashed in the venue parking lot, destroying several cars in the process.  Who was it that had originally created this inflatable for Pink Floyd ?»

Jonathan Park: «That was in Atlanta, yeah, I think. That was created by Jeffery Shaw (of the Amsterdam based Evenstructure Research Group) who had designed the first Pig (that had escaped over the Battersea Power Station). He's still around, he works in Holland but he's British, and he was also an inflatable creator. And it was made with limited technical experience... again, with inflatables, and things that fly in the air, you have to be very aware of the effects of the wind, which they were not. They made no real analysis of the wind or taken sufficient account of it. The wind drag causes tethered balloons to fly at an angle to the ground.  That's why hot air balloons always start at 4 or 5 o'clock in the morning when it's very very calm so they go straight up rather than get dragged along by a wind before they can get off the ground. It was actually built by a regular company who made inflatable structures, like inflatable hangers for airplanes. Because a lot of the inflatables, I realize now, came from the war time creation of instant buildings, and decoy tanks etc. like inflatable hangers that you could move around to house airplanes and keep them out of sight».

«An Interview with Jonathan Park (Part 1) by Michael Simone», RogerWaters.org Website

7 June 1975 Atlanta Stadium, Atlanta, USA


« As we all know, Pink Floyd is a a trip of a different color. But their appearance at Braves Stadium this Saturday at 8:30 should trample most concertgoers wildest conceptions. On this, their only Southern show, production costs will hover at a crisp $ 40,000. A Bowie or Genesis concert punches in at a mere $2 or $3,000. What does all this money buy, then ?  How about helium balloons and an airplane (which had to be cleared through the F.A.A.), tons of dry ice, laser lights, a pyramidally enclosed stage and oh, yes, the Stadium -- no lightweight playground, it. 

Fastidious with their sound, the Floyd will plop their quad on the lip of the Stadium's bowl so as not to lose a trace of Ummagumma, Atom Heart Mother, Echo.. or The Dark Side of the Moon, ail of which will be featured.  They are the only act (who could open such a show, Godzilla?) and will play for 3 hours. If you can't afford the $8 admission price grab a blanket and listen from I 85*. One more thing: Be nice, the Gods are watching »

« Music », Great Speckled Bird, 5 June 1975


* A local Atlanta radio station

9 June 1975 Capitol Centre, Washington, USA

« Extravagance is a by word in rock 'n' roll, but it is doubtful that there is anywhere a band with a vision more grandiose than Pink Floyd, who opened the first of two nights at the Capital Centre last night with a show that even Cecil B. DeMille would have found hard to top » 

« The Pink Floyd experience », Washington Post, 10 June 1975

10 June 1975 Capital Centre, Landover, USA

«Extravagance is a by word in rock 'n' roll, but it is doubtful that there is anywhere a band with a vision more grandiose than Pink Floyd, who opened the first of two nights at the Capital Centre last night with a show that even Cecil B. DeMille would have found hard to top» 

«The Pink Floyd experience», Washington Post, 10 June 1975

Sketches of Roger and Nick drawn by Roger Waters during a dinner at Washington, 10th June 1975.

12 June 1975 Spectrum Theater, Philadelphia, USA

Photographies by « Philadelphia Enquirer » (left) and Roger BARONE (right)

« Pink Floyd, one of the original electronic "space rock” groups, returned to the Spectrum on Thursday evening with a disappointing show, now only a mere parody of the musical medium that they originally created.

The British group, together since 1964, includes Dave Gilmour on guitar, Rick Wright on assorted keyboards, Roger Walters on bass, and Nicky Mason on drums. It was at the vanguard of musical and theatrical innovation during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Pink Floyd was one of the first group to use such techniques as its shows, films, fireworks, and quad sound in their stage presentation. Their last album, "Dark Side of the Moon,” released in 1973, was hailed as an artistic and commercial masterpiece and has sold over three million copies, giving the group their present claim to super-star status. But unfortunately, in the more-’ than two years since the group has played Philadelphia, their once magical stage charisma and musical perfection seems to have been lost.

The 1975 Pink Floyd show seems to be little more than going through the motions of creating music. The group has become a media “hype,” relying on reputation and expectation to get them through the night.

Sure, the show still retains some nice visual and aural effects, such as an interesting film that coincides with their performance of “Dark Side of the Moon,” or use of a 360-degree sound system. But what of the musical content? Sloppy playing, off-key vocals, poor transitions from song to song, ineffectual solos and overuse of gimmicks all combined to make Pink Floyd’s performance a deadly bore.

To top it off, the new material from their much-delayed new album, songs such as “Raving and Drooling” and “You Gotta Be Crazy,” were plodding, lumbering pieces, relying on form rather than content to carry their gluttonous weight. As so often happens in the pop-music business the band has turned into a tediously mediocre supergroup, relying on "psychedelic overkill” to woo their 19,000-strong audience. And as usual the audience loved every minute of it, mistaking tricks for talent and accepting Muzak instead of music »

« Pink Floyd has turned pale », The Philadelphia Inquirer, 14 June 1975

David, Roger and Rick photographed backstage by  Roger BARONE.

13 June1975 Spectrum Theater, Philadelphia, PA, USA

Photographies by Robert ALTFORD (left) and K.C Wisley (right)

14 June, For the following outdoor shows, the band decides to use their first inflatable prop in his history (and in the history of the rock & roll) .

This inflatable pyramid was created for this  tour by Jonathan Park (a rock concert set designer and engineer) and Mark Fisher (a rock concert set architect).

Even the band used previously a kind of prop before (see the 4th November 1973 show), this is the first collaboration with this team

The doomed pyramid (picture of the Pittsburgh show)

15 June 1975 Roosevelt Stadium, Jersey City, USA

« The Pink Floyd ran into trouble at their Roosevelt Stadium open-air gig recently. The flaming airplane which sails on stage at the climax of their set got stuck some 50 feet before it reached the stage and burnt out over the heads of the audience.  The Floyd also had wind problems - their giant pyramid stage covering threatened tornblow away for most of the performance * 

The set comprises mostly new material plus some okdies like Heart of the Sun (sic). The crowd of nearly 40,000 were kept entranced by the back projection and Floyd’s quad sound »

« Floyd get a blow out », Sounds, 5 July 1975


* The band will have some troubles with this Inflatable pyramid at Pittsburgh

The Pyramid as seen at this gig

16 June 1975 Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, Long Island, USA

Photographies by Richard E. Aaron

« While the rock world is teadily inundated by German space‐rock ensembles, Pink, Floyd keeps indefatigably making music that antedated the Germans and is superior to nearly all of them.

Not that the English quartet, which played the first of two consecutive evening concerts Monday at the Nassau Coliseum, is purely devoted to rambling, hypnotic instrumentals of the sort the Germans favor. Pink Floyd can boogie, almost, what with the crunching rhythm section of Roger Waters (bass guitar) and Nicky Mason (drums), plus a fervent saxophone player and two black women singers.

And the group's songs have an unusually suggestive poetic quality—great literature, even, in the context of the flatulent pseudo‐mythology of so many recent space rock lyrics—and the singing isn't half bad at all, especially that of Dave Gilmour, the lead guitarist.

But the core of the act remains the instrumentals, and the core of those instrumentals is Rick Wright, the keyboard player. Mr. Wright makes music of a coloristic richness that is more entrancing than almost any of his competition that one can think of, and yet his flights stay firmly grounded in lucidity and rhythmic directness. And for all the others' gifts on their own, they do their best work in support of Mr. Wright.

Monday's program consisted of a first half devoted to all new material, a second half consisting of an extended version of « Dark Side of the Moon », the group's most re‐, cent album (released more than two years ago), and an encore of « Echoes », from « Meddle » (1971). Although the group doesn't itself dress up in the futuristic mode favored by some, its special effects remained as telling as ever, with a huge, sawtoothed eye made of reflecting mirrors, the center spinning one way and the outer part the other, at the end of the first, half, and a surprisingly good] sequence of film clips to illustrate “Dark Side of the Moon.” In all, a persuasive evening, as long as one was prone to respond to this sort of music in the first place »

« Pink Floyd plays at rambling best », New York Times, 18 June 1975

Photography by Richard E. Aaron

Waters :

« I just don't think they understand the songs or what they're about. If you read old interviews, they actually say that. I can remember interviews from «Dark Side of the Moon», where Rick was saying, « We really don't care about the lyrics». They remain connected to the numbers, the money, and so that's what you get, that's what you feel through it all ».

« The Man Behind Pink Floyd's The Wall », Greg Knot, 1999.


Mason:

« After « Dark Side of the Moon », it would have been best if Roger had left the band. Only: then we would not have recorded « The Wall ». Without us it probably wouldn’t have worked out the way it did. These tensions between us have always been good for our music. Just not for the musicians ».

« A band is like a marriage, with multiple husbands » by Martin Stolz, Die Welt, November 2014.

Nick Mason received a Gold Disc for the « Dark Side » sales in USA in the name of the band.

17 June1975 Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, New York, USA

18 June 1975 Boston Gardens, New York, USA

Photographies by Gary GAMACHE

« While the rock world is is teadily inundated by German space‐rock ensembles, Pink, Floyd keeps indefatigably making music that antedated the Germans and is superior to nearly all of them. Not that the English quartet, which played the first of two consecutive evening concerts Monday at the Nassau Coliseum, is purely devoted to rambling, hypnotic instrumentals of the sort the Germans favor. Pink Floyd can boogie, almost, what with the crunching rhythm section of Roger Waters (bass guitar) and Nicky Mason (drums), plus a fervent saxophone player and two black women singers. And the group's songs have an unusually suggestive poetic quality—great literature, even, in the context of the flatulent pseudo‐mythology of so many recent space rock lyrics—and the singing isn't half bad at all, especially that of Dave Gilmour, the lead guitarist. But the core of the act remains the instrumentals, and the core of those instrumentals is Rick Wright, the keyboard player. Mr. Wright makes music of a coloristic richness that is more entrancing than almost any of his competition that one can think of, and yet his flights stay firmly grounded in lucidity and rhythmic directness. And for all the others' gifts on their own, they do their best work in support of Mr. Wright. Monday's program consisted of a first half devoted to all new material, a second half consisting of an extended version of « Dark Side of the Moon », the group's most re‐, cent album (released more than two years ago), and an encore of « Echoes », from « Meddle » (1971). Although the group doesn't itself dress up in the futuristic mode favored by some, its special effects remained as telling as ever, with a huge, sawtoothed eye made of reflecting mirrors, the center spinning one way and the outer part the other, at the end of the first, half, and a surprisingly good] sequence of film clips to illustrate “Dark Side of the Moon.” In all, a persuasive evening, as long as one was prone to respond to this sort of music in the first place »

« Pink Floyd plays at rambling best », New York Times, 18 June 1975.


« It was hot and sticky in Boston Garden Wednesday night and the humidity, seemed to cling to the rafters of the Causeway street arena where a seven-foot model plane hung in waiting for its swift flight over 15,000 sweaty space-rock 1 fans who would later cheer i its crash landing on the stage. Yes folks, Pink Floyd had returned to Boston. Their | concerts are rare events since Floyd’s music depends so much on their immense ability to manipulate the technology . of the recording studio where they have consistently extended the boundaries of modern i rock music. Two years ago, Pink Floyd recorded “The Dark Side of the Moon" which has since become one of the most successful albums in the history of the recording industry. It has already sold around four million copies and the current tour of America by this British quartet of electronic innovators has pulled the album back into the Top 25 on the ’ Billboard chart.

Those who follow popular music needn’t be reminded that Pink Floyd hasn’t always enjoyed mass popularity. Actually, prior to their fabulous and unexpected success with “Dark Side Of The Moon,” the group was playing music so strange and adventuresome, so esoteric, so weird, really that only those bored by basic rock beats were listening to their bizarre, extraterrestrial music trips. You see, Pink Floyd is not a rock ’n’ roll band. They proved that again Wednesday night during a three-hour performance punctuated by spectacular special effects that would make some Hollywood pros envious. The group appeared on stage amidst the now-obligatory clouds of billowing white smoke and reeled off three new compositions from “Wish You Were Here,” their first album in over two years (and their first for Columbia) which is scheduled for a mid-August release.

“Raving and Drooling” and “You Gotta Be Crazy”, featured David Gilmour’s majestic guitar sweeps and the eerie tape effects of Richard Wright. The third piece, which ended the opening segment, was entitled “Shine On You Crazy Diamond,” Pink Floyd’s tribute to founder Syd Barrett whose eccentricity apparently knew no bounds when he and the group parted company back in late-1967. Roger Waters’ words did little to change Pink Floyd’s long-standing reputation for singing looney-bin lyrics. But vocals have always been secondary to the ravishing musical textures that give them a futuristic, symphonic feel that is more real and pleasing in every way than the sounds of the dime-a-dozen Pink Floyd pretenders now popping up in Germany. A brief intermission was followed by the heavy heart beat which opened a complete performance of “Dark Side Of The Moon.” Backed by Dick Parry on sax and the angelic backup vocals of studio veterans Carlena Williams and Vanetta Fields, the intergalactic-tour guides did a remarkable job of reproducing the complex electronics of the record. But the real crowd-pleas-er wasn’t even in Boston. 

Film director Peter Madec (“The Ruling Class”), who is a personal friend of the band, combined slow-motion film clips, quick-dissolve stills and breathtaking animation into a psychedelic stew that was projected onto a circular screen above the stage. The more startling segments of Madec's work elicited spontaneous cheers from the capacity crowd. The show ended with “Echoes,” an extended encore from the 1971 album “Meddle.” For a band of its stature, Pink Floyd is a bit short on raw musicianship but they utilize what gifts they have with more imagination and taste than any other group in the genre. They should be with us for a long time to come »

« Pink Floyd at Boston Garden », The Boston Globe, 20 June 1975


Mason:

« On another occasion, at a gig at the Boston Gardens, squads of fire marshals were positioned around the venue to prevent us letting use unauthorised pyrotechnics. Show time arrived with no pvro. in sight. In fact, it had all been secreted in boxes ready for individual members of the road crew to abandon their innocent demeanour and make a strategic dash to detonate a particular charge. The marshals began to rumble this tactic, but the crew were one step ahead As one sprinting roadie was rugger-tackled by a hefty marshal, another explosion revealed that this had been a diversionary ruse. It was only our manager’s Irish name and connections in Boston that stopped us all being locked up »

« Inside Out: A Personal History of Pink Floyd », Nick Mason, 2005

Peter Watts, Steve O’Rourke and David Gilmour (left). The technical crew (right)

20 June 1975 Three Rivers Stadium, Pittsburgh, USA

« From virtually every angle. Incredible was the word (…) It was incredible how a first-place baseball team with the third best record in the majors drew only 8.200 there Thursday evening, yet a band with no h 11 singles to i I s credit attracted nearly 50.000, a stadium rock show record.

It was Incredible how well-behaved the fans were, their jumps from the dugout roofs (most quite clumsy, ending Ingloriously down In the dirt) to get a seat on the field notwithstanding.

Police reported no more than the usual number of underage drinkers, fistfights and injuries from "jumping from ramp lo ramp," although one would-be gatecrasher fell a goodly distance when the rope he was using to scale a wall broke and another youth was badly cut after being slugged in the face with a bottle by an attacker who melted into the mob in the home plate area.

It was incredible how the British quartet, which last appeared here two years ago, lured fans from West Virginia and Ohio, and other stales but. then, incredible was the only word for the multimedia show which illustrated “Dark Side of the Moon," the second half of their act. The first segment (there was no warmup band) consisted of three songs ("Raving and Drooling," “You’ve Got to be Cray" and "Shine on You Crazy Diamond”) from their new album, and describing them Is nearly useless; they can’t be pigeonholed.

They’re typical Pink Floyd, albeit In the more commercial vein begun on « Dark Side » long (the shortest lasted 10 minutes), tempos and styles changing within each one. David Gilmour's guitar hooting, wailing and flaring, drummer Nick Mason and bassist Roger Waters providing the firm foundation, keyboard man Rick Wright leading or embellishing as needed. It still was light when they started (and (he weather was Incredible, too), detracting from the mood so vital to appreciating and enjoying Pink Floyd’s music. Call it what you will — space rock, cerebral rock, thinking man’s rock — It needs darkness so the lights and props can raise the sound into a real sensory experience. Using the bulk of « Dark Side » their best-known album, as the second part of their show was the same format they employed two years ago — but what a difference this lime.

A huge "tambourine" behind the band proved to be a screen on which were shown film clips "describing’’ each song. For "Speak to Me." 11 s greatly-amplified heartbeat booming through the stadium, they were ambulance and hospital scones, an eyeball and the moon. "Breathe" and "On the Run" were accompanied by an airport and runway, the plane later nosediving earthward while a lighted plane ran over the crowd on a wire and "crashed" behind the stage In a great flash of light. On ’Time." dock faces , zipped by endlessly from an unseen source, and for "Money" their usual tough concert version), the film had piles of coins, speedboats contrasted with shabby vagrants on park benches and a nearly-naked go-go dancer. "Any Colour You Like" featured the New York skyline and people plodding to work, and "Brain Damage" went

back lo the hospital, Interspersed with shots of Fidel Castro, Henry Kissinger, George Wallace and. of course. Richard Nixon, among others.

And to top U all off. a monstrous white pyramid that had hovered behind them alt night rose slowly from Its mornings as spotlights beamed off it and rose high above the crowd (on wires), riding completely out of the stadium. The music, as good as it was (although they have played better), was Incidental - « I didn’t come for the music as much as 1 came (or the party » one youth said. Pink Floyd sure knows how lo show their guests a good time »

« Pink Floyd hit at Stadium », Pittsburgh Press, 21 June 1975


« On June 20, 1975 with nothing to do and no tickets, Flash talked me into heading to Pittsburgh for the Pink Floyd concert at Three Rivers Stadium. It was sold out but we found a deal with a scalper and took the show in. Never a fan, I went for the party and eye candy and actually had a good time. They be crazy in Pittsburgh but friendly as I recall ».

« 1970’s Outdoor Rock Concerts/Festivals: How Did I Survive? », Doc Lehman on Bangagong!, 14 February 2008. 


« Lors du spectacle que le groupe donnait en fin de semaine à Pittsburgh devant plus de 50 000 personnes, certains incidents techniques ont irrémédiablement endommagé la gigantesque pyramide gonflée à l’hélium servant de toit protecteur aux quelques tonnes d’équipement sonore et visuel. A la fin du spectacle, la pyramide fut projetée comme prévu à plus de deux cents pieds dans les airs. Mais des vents très violents ont causé la rupture des trois cables qui l’ancraient au sol et l’ont entraînée quelques centaines de pieds plus loin où elle s’est écrasée lamentablement à quelques pas d’une autoroute.

Brûlé en maints endroits, la fameuse pyramide a dû rendre l’âme après que des admirateurs acharnés lui eurent arraché des morceaux et des lambeaux pour s’en faire des reliques évaluées à plusieurs milliers de dollars »

« Pink Floyd, se pyramide en moins », La Presse, 26 June 1975

Roger Waters:

« Around them when we lost the top of the pyramid at Three Rivers Stadium in Pittsburgh, we did leap off the front of the stage and walk back to the hotel through the crowd without anybody recognized »

« The Simple Facts », Roger Waters The Wall Deluxe Edition


Mason:

« The device ascended to a few hundred feet before inverting, allowing the balloon in its peak to emerge like a teardrop through the base. ’My God, it’s giving birth,’ one chemically affected American shouted as it emerged. Now of course the fabric had insufficient lift - so as the teardrop headed for the stratosphere the world’s biggest wet blanket settled ungracefully into the car park to be ripped to shreds by some scavenging souvenir hunters. At the end of this show, we were able to walk to the front of the stage, drop down to the ground and stroll without any hassle to our nearby hotel. This brought home the fact that our pyramid was more recognizable than we were - which was just how we liked it »

« Inside Out - A Personal History of Pink Floyd », Nick Mason, 2005

An unintentional effect: the flying pyramid

Photographies of the Milwaukee rehearsals by Rick KOHLMEYER

22.06.1975 County Stadium, Milwaukee, USA

Photographies by Jeffrey MAYER.

«It was dusk at the Stadium Sunday Pink clouds were in the sky and Pink Floyd was on stage. The clouds heraled heavy rain that soaked 54,000 rock hungry fans. Meanwhile, Pink Floyd, although interrupted by showers periodically all night, produced its own storm — a musical cloudburst.

The group laid down a deluge of sound that traversed the Stadium and surrounded spec* tutors. It was ethereal, timeless music. Often percussionist Nick Mason dropped his sticks as Richard Wright mesmerized the assemblage with his organ chords.

The rain prevented the band from reaching its stride, but even at a lope Floyd is cooking. Because of light show equipment Floyd had no rain canopy and fled whenever raindrops fell.

«You gotta be crazy» bass guitarist Rodger Waters sang. He might have been talking about: performing in Sunday night's weather, Floyd's music is suited to a large, open air concert. Without overdoing the volume, the quartet managed to overcome the ambient sounds of thou* sands of fans, who prattled heedlessly during the concert.

The band began slowly and deliberately and built toward a mind smashing finale, Lightning that sporadically slashed the sky was no match for Floyd's light show, which included pink fog, strobes, a racket "attack" on the stage and a giant round movie screen on which menacing images progressed,

A monstrous blinking eye projected on the screen caused mare chills than the rains that cooled the humid night,

"A contest between Mother Nature and Pink Floyd," said one announcer, summing up the evening for the cro w d, Floyd won, Clouds of smoke floated over the stage as Pink Floyd performed between rainstorms at the Stadium Sunday »

« Pink Floyd play up Storm », Milwaukee Sentinel, 23 June 1975 


« On Sunday, June 22, the Milwaukee County Stadium hosted one of the finest productions in rock music. The entertainers were the British rock group. Pink Flovd, consisting of David Gilmour, Roger Waters, Richard Wright and Nick Mason. Fink Floyd is the exception rather than the rule when it comes to progressive music. Their imagination draws from the extraordinary, the grotesque, the unknown and the future. Not being limited to the realm of magical mysticism, Fink Floyd catered to their most recent fans by playing Dark Side of the Moon.

At times, it seemed like too much recent Fink Floyd fanaticism, too little Ummagumma and Echoes. The audience had smoked through upwards of three hours of rain-soaked delays, though the group did its best to cheer them with their faithful “Dark Side’’ hits.

The audience appeared stunned throughout Fink Floyd’s masterful approach toward special effects. Onlookers were to either to be surrounded by ethereal shrouds of fog or captivated by numerous stage explosions and fireworks. In fact, people surrounding the stage on the field were to spend much of the night in a Fink Floyd obscured cloud. Accompanied by an arrangement of movies along with Dark Side of the Moon, Fink Floyd again proved to be imaginative in other fields. Along with Pink Floyd’s menagerie of special effects, the people were also a unique vice of entertainment.  At times they appeared disappointed because of the rain, other times they expressed themselves as children would at a circus act; in complete awe

because of Fink Floyd's intensity to hold a crowd. In a way. it could be said that Fink Floyd is totally different from any other type of entertainment. They became so involved in what they're doing that they let you make the decision to their saucerful of secrets »

« British Rock group in performance at stadium », The McHenry Plaindealer, 11 July 1975

« A few weeks ago, the Rolling Stones blew into town with all the hoopla and fanfare usually reserved for royalty. The concert was well received but a lot of people asked why Jagger didn't do Satisfaction. Jagger neglected to give that song to his audience and some were left un-fulfilled. But Sunday at the Stadium another British group gave the crowd an abundance of satisfaction. Pink Floyd, performers extraordinaire, dueled with the sound and light show of a rather ruffled Mother Nature, and were proclaimed unanimously the winners by the 54,000 drenched fans. Floyd adapted themselves to the 

unpredictable burst of rain that stopped their show three times with professional ease and treat-ed the throng to an exciting multi-visual performance. 

Starting at precisely 8:30 p.m., the group casually walked on stage to the roaring approval of the crowd. Many of the concert-goers had waited too many sweltering hours in the sun for the moment when the wizards of "space" music would appear. After a rather restrained open-ing number the group began to demonstrate its uncanny knack of combining bizarre electronic music with genuinely good blues and the Stadium was filled with exquisite sounds. Just about then ominous clouds dropped their load on the setting causing Pink Floyd to scurry from the stage. Tarps were thrown over their huge collection of equipment and the waiting began. This was to happen two more times during the evening. Unfortunately, it broke up the continuity of the show and per-haps took some of its impact away. Due to the construction of a tent over the stage towards the end of the show, a huge round screen used to show mind boggling movies of images and patterns, was obscured from view. The crowd handled it-self well during the delays and Pink Floyd was more than amiable. Even though their actual playing time was greatly reduced by the interruptions, their performance was stunning. Selections from Dark Side of the Moon were flawless. The crowd was mesmerized. Pink Floyd lived up to its heralded reputation as innovators in music with excitement and awe. Pink Floyd ended the show around 12:30 a.m. but the crowd refused to let them go. After stomping, screaming and clap-ping for close to fifteen minutes, the masses began to grumble as the efficient stage crew began to dismantle the equipment. But patience and a lot of lung power prevailed and five minutes later Floyd was back to do another number, perhaps as a gift to the dripping fan »

« Pink Floyd fools Mother Nature», The University of Wisconsin Post, 25 June 1975

A view of the audience

Mason:

« We tried hard to remedy the problem (of the inflatable pyramid) by sending the whole rig for repair and redesign during a series of indoor shows, but, bugged by poor weather, the difficulties of transporting the helium, and further high winds, w hen we got to Pittsburgh two weeks later, we eventually - like Captain Hornblower faced with an out-of-control mainsail - instructed someone to cut the thing free.

The device ascended to a few hundred feet before inverting, allowing the balloon in its peak to emerge like a teardrop through the base. ’My God, it’s giving birth,’ one chemically affected American shouted as it emerged. Now of course the fabric had insufficient lift - so as the teardrop headed for the stratosphere the world’s biggest wet blanket settled ungracefully into the car park to be ripped to shreds by some scavenging souvenir hunters. At the end of this show, we were able to walk to the front of the stage, drop down to the ground and stroll without any hassle to our nearby hotel. This brought home the fact that our pyramid was more recognizable than we were - which was just how we liked it »

« Inside Out - A Personal History of Pink Floyd », Nick Mason, 2005

23 June 1975 Olympia Stadium, Detroit, USA

Photography by John COLLER.

«Just about everything was working against Pink Floyd at its Monday night concert at Olympia Stadium. Fortunately, the one thing that was perfectly right was the music. Pink Floyd is not nearly as well known to the general public. as some groups that attract legions of hard-core rock fans, but nevertheless it has been hugely successful since of Floyd were put to the test: Could their music, without many of their infamous special effects, make 17,000 people forget the misery of being crammed into a building that felt like a steam-bath gone mad ?

As part of the contract with Pink Floyd. Olympia used festival-style seating for the Floyd’s Monday and Tuesday concerts, and the result was sweaty 'thigh jammed against sweaty thigh on the main floor where fans sat cross-legged like sweltering Indians.

As i f the heat weren’t enough, Monday’s audience was denied a special film by Peter Medak, director of “The Ruling Class.” The film, an interpretation of Floyd’s “Dark Side of the Moon,” was on the premises, but the projector was soaked during a downpour at an outdoor date in Milwaukee Sunday, and was out of commission. Despite all that, bassist Roger Waters, keyboard man Rick Wright, drummer Nicky Mason and guitarist Dave Gilmour kept the crowd cool with their jazzed-inspired rock. The show included “You’ve Got to Be Crazy,” a bluesy number from Floyd’s tenth album, “Wish You Were Here” (due in mid-August), as well as a lengthy helping from “Dark Side of the Moon.”

The group even turned the old ballroom mirrored globe to its own use, bathing the crowd in a swirl of stars. Pink Floyd’s futuristic but never garish music shows the polish of over 10 years together, with only one personnel change, and the group proved Monday that its music, nothing more, is the foundation of its long success»

«Olympia's heat didn't wilt the jazzy rock of Pink Floyd», Free Press, 23 June 1975

24 June 1975 Olympia Stadium, Detroit, USA

26 June 1975 Autostade, Montréal, Canada

« Ce devait être un super-spectacle c'en fut un. Pink Floyd, le flamand rose interplanétaire, a fait escale à Montreal jeudi soir et s est livré à une véritable orgie pyrotechnique (voir les détails ci- contre). Pas d’orgie musicale cependant, mais plutôt une orgie sonore, ce qui n a pas de quoi surprendre, parce que Pink Floyd, depuis la lointaine époque du disque Ummagumma, a toujours été le chef de file du bruissement électronique interstellaire et de la sonorisation à outrance Nous y reviendrons plus loin. Parce que le spectacle, le public le donnait aussi lui-même. Spectacle avant le spectacle, tant qu’il lit clair, alors que les frisbee et autres objets plastifiés volaient de toutes parts, que l’âcre odeur du haschisch se mêlait aux effluves d alcool, que des individus aux allures de gourou, et d autres, affichant mine et tenue de croque-mort, circulaient pour le plus grand plaisir des yeux, fournissant matière à réflexion aux anthropologues et psychanalystes amateurs, ces voyeurs à la tournure d esprit scientifique. 

Spectacle pendant le spectacle, même, alors que des milliers de flammes (dont quelques Bic Butane, sans doute), tenues à bout de bras, illuminèrent l'immense enceinte à deux reprises, qu’on fit grande consommation de feux de Bengale et de fusées colorées, qu’on alla meme jusqu'à allumer des feux de camp, utilisant comme combustible tous les déchets trouvables sur le terrain.  Tableau assez hallucinant vu du haut des gradins de I’Autostade un gigantesque trou ovale au fond duquel, à la lueur des feux, se presse une foule qu'on croirait primitive, et a une extrémité du cratère, une plate-forme brillante et colorée, siège d une activité électronique qui présage de l'avenir. Le spectacle était donc complet, et même davantage: les Twins Otters survolaient presque le site avant de se poser tout à coté, sur la piste Adac, rappelant sans cesse la dimension aérienne de la musique floydienne, et pendant « Dark Side of The Moon », la lune répondit à I appel et monta lentement dans le ciel.  Tout le monde serait probablement d’accord pour dire que la musique, l’interprétation instrumentale, a été reléguée au troisième plan de ce spectacle, derrière les gadgets, visuels surtout, mais aussi sonores Ce qu’il faut réaliser cependant, c'est que la plus grande partie des trucages sonores ne dépendait pas des musiciens eux-mêmes, et que ceux-ci furent meme de longs moments sans participer activement au déroulement du spectacle. D’ailleurs si l’on se fie à la première moitié du concert, qui leur était plus strictement réservé, on n’a pas le goût de se plaindre de la demi-absence qui a suivi, parce que les quatre premières pieces furent rien moins qu’ennuyeuses. 

A la fin de I intermission, les célébrés battements de coeur super-amplifiés annoncèrent le début de Dark Side of The Moon’’ et c'est alors que les feux de Tenter (ça, c’est à côté) et les trompettes de Jericho conjuguèrent leurs efforts et firent trembler l'Autostade heureusement pour moi il ne s'est pas effondré). 

Hululements, grincements, râlements, gémissements et bruits astronautique divers tournoyèrent dans l’atmosphere, judicieusement mis en mouvement giratoire par le système de son quadriphonique dont les hauts-parleurs se trouvaient non seulement devant les spectateurs, mais aussi derrière eux tt sur leurs flancs C'a peut sembler simpliste mais ça tait son petit effet et on se fait prendre.immanquablement D’autant plus que les meilleurs effets sonores sont enregistrés sur ruban magnétique et que l ingénieur du son (un artiste en son genre) a beaucoup plus de facilité a les contrôler que les passages instrumentaux exécutes par les musiciens en direct.  l’ink Floyd touchera tous les thèmes, politiques, sociaux, écologiques et sentimentaux, puis culminera avec Money", I hymne a l'argent, dévoilant sans pudeur le fond de sa pensée, devant des spectateurs qui ne sont pas dupes, mais ravis/ Après une ovation de quinze minutes, le Flamand Rose donnera "Echoes" en rappel et un gars hirsute m'expliquera le sens de cette grandiose célébration: 

Man, tu viens de voir brûler deux cent mille piastres J ’avais jamais vu un trip" fort comme ça. Y m'ont embarqué en crisse" 

Qui a dit que l'argent ne fait pas le bonheur ? Les maniaques de I’audio-visuel et du gadget se seront sûrement gaves l’oeil jeudi soir a l’Autostade Le groupe Pink Floyd donnait un spectacle d une envergure jamais égalée à Montréal. Des tonnes d images splendides, des jeux scéniques envoûtants et un éclairage avant ont contribue à donner au concert Pink Floyd une allure surnaturelle. Les producteurs et les techniciens avaient déjà, longtemps avant l'événement, décrit en termes plus ou moins vagues le cote super-spectaculaire du show1 On avait surtout cité des chiffres astronomiques ou parlé de quantité de watts a disperser A la fin de cette soiree, il était en effet assez facile de constater qu'il ne s'agissait pas de paroles en l'air Deux heures de spectacle qui auront dépense du lus hydro-québécois et des gros bidous. Une foule de rockers, de greasers et de peace loves évaluée à près de 40 000 personnes s'est entassée sur le parterre et dans les gradins de I Autostade pour entendre le phénomène Pink Floyd. On leur a donne de la vision en supplement Et quelle vision' Pink Floyd naviguait sur un vaisseau d’or et d’argent ce jeudi soir; grand vaisseau doré propulsé vers la lune et les étoiles par une musique constellaire et des images d'acide Ce navire de l’espace ressemblait avant le début du concert, a un beau monstre mécanique Sur une grande scene ou étaient alignées les traditionnelles caisses de son. les amplificateurs et I éclairage, peu d elements laissaient deviner le miracle auquel nous allions avoir droit Pourtant le tond de scene avait un cote mystérieux et intrigant Derrière les musiciens on pouvait apercevoir un disque d une vingtaine de pieds de diamètre, sorte de soucoupe volante d argent que 1 on aurait plaquée ventre au mur Au-dessus, un peu en biais comme I aureole sur la tele des anges et des saints, une grande hostie de toile blanche retenue par deux longs bras d acier couvrait la presque totalité de la scene Statique et a 1 éclairage du jour, cet ensemble formait avant les premiers accords une sculpture étonnante.  Puis ce tut le depart assez lent, décevant même Petit a petit, a coup de joints et d alcool, à force de musique sciante et envoûtante la foule entra dans la paille pour vrai Les navigateurs cosmiques venaient d embarquer leurs passagers et I immense machine scénique se mit en branle Aux accents stridents de la musique Pinkfloydienne. le grand disque d argent amorça alors une danse rotative verticale, se métamorphosant en un bijou mécanique qui prit, au fur et a mesure que passaient les secondes, des formes fascinantes Belle sculpture cinétique qui termina plus tard son vol imaginaire en jetant mille feux sur une foule ébahie C'est a partir de ce moment précis  que la machine vint voler la vedette au groupe Pink Floyd.

Pendant 1 intermission, les machinistes se sont empressés autour de la soucoupe et ont déposé le bijou dans son ecrint Pendant ce temps la grande aureole de toile changeait de position. lentement, presque imperceptiblement, pour venir se placer face à la foule, déterminant ainsi le nouveau fond de scène Lorsque le groupe reprit ses instruments, on eut droit à un spectacle son et images hallucinant Tous les spectateurs avaient maintenant les yeux rivés sur la pastille de toile Projetés savamment sur ce gigantes que écran circulaire, des dizaines de dessins fixes ou animés d une grande beauté, des photographies et des films entrecoupés de jeux de lumière impressionnants venaient appuyer les paroles et illustrer la musique du groupe anglais. Beaucoup d humour. Anglais, l’humour. cela s'entend. Une poésie spatio-temporelle Imaginaire fantastique qui nous amenait tous à travers I espace vers des planètes inconnues, à travers le temps perdu Un véritable kaléidoscope qui aura propulsé les spectateurs vers d autres cieux. Ici. McLuhan aurait trouvé son bonheur Une oeuvre de maître Le procédé de la projection a été maintes fois utilisé durant des concerts, mais rarement avec autant d'éclat. 

Vraiment un voyage au-delà de la réalité. Superbe II y eut bien d'autres gadgets comme de petits avions qui, descendant du haut de l'Autostade, vinrent exploser sur la scène avec grand bruit. Eiffel surprenant, certes, mais dont on aurait pu se passer Beaucoup de boucane, aussi, l'éternelle boucane usée des feux de l’enfer. Un élément qu’il faut absolument souligner: le travail de galérien accompli par les gens de Kosmos et Donald K Donald Co production réussie qui fait la preuve que nos artisans du spectacle sont à la hauteur Des organisateurs, des artistes et des ouvriers qui ont pris une grande expérience en peu de temps et qui comprennent dorénavant très bien leur métier On aurait aimé que les bras du service de sécurité parlent un peu français et soient plus courtois, mais quand on est bras ...  Pink Floyd à l’Autostade, un show cosmique où le decor a dépassé de loin la performance des musiciens »

« Pink Floyd à l'Autostade: une fête coûteuse mais réussie », Le Soleil, 28 June 1975 


« Quelque 40 000 personnes, dont Georges-Hébert Germain, se sont rendues à l’Autostade, il y a un quart de siècle, pour voir, encore plus sans doute qu’entendre, le groupe de rock Pink Floyd. Mais Germain, comme en faisait foi son compte rendu du lendemain (27 juin 1975), n’avait pas été enthousiasmé. Heureusement que Pink Floyd avait un soutien visuel considérable (un écran circulaire, un petit avion sous les projecteurs, etc.). Parce que selon Georges-Hébert Germain, « sans soutien visuel, la musique de Pink Floyd est étonnamment plate et insignifiante. Elle ne s’anime que par l’image. » Et dans la première partie du spectacle, il n’y en avait aucun. Ce qui fait que ces toutes ces nouvelles, « à nos yeux, n’avaient pas plus de signification que n’importe quelle musique de rock band moyen. Mais celui-là, faut bien le dire, avait avec lui le plus gros système de son au monde » 

«Souvenirs, souvenirs - Pink Floyd à l’Autostade», La Presse, 25 June 2000.


«Pink Floyd brought its distinct blend of space rock music to Montreal in grand style last night, entertaining more than 40,000 enthusiastic fans with two hours of stunning music and dazzling spectacle.

With about 30 tons of special equipment loaded onto the open-air stage at the Autostade, the British group and a small army of sound engineers and lighting technicians created an atmosphere of mind-boggling effects. A large crystal star mounted above the stage reflected a multitude of colored lights onto a giant global screen behind as the music pumped through the mountains of loudspeakers.

After a shaky start, marred by minor technical problems; the group swung into top gear with a selection of some of its most popular tunes from the til albums it has recorded since 1968. It also played two new compositions, Raving and Drooling and Gotta Be Crazy, from its new album, yet untitled, due for release later this year. The highlight of the performance came after the 20-minute interval when the group played their ninth album. Dark Side of the Moon. After-eight years together as a group, Pink Floyd has perfected the performance of its music to a fine art. Throughout the concert, they kept the intricate structures of their compositions under perfect control. Rick Wright on keyboards and guitarist Dave Gilmour produced polished performances during their solos. As the group's current tour of North .America nears a close, the concert may be among the last Pink Floyd will perform.  Following the tour the group will disband, a source close to the group said in London recently. Spokesmen for the group would neither confirm nor deny the report, however »

«Pink Floyd dazzles fans in grand style», The Gazette, 28 June 1975


Donald K. Donald (Gig’s promoter)

«C’est difficile à déterminer, mais je dirais du spectacle de Pink Floyd à l’Autostade (que) c’a été un événement artistique merveilleux, un concert mémorable. Au deuxième rang, je mentionnerais leur spectacle, deux ans plus tard, au Stade Olympique. Sur le plan artistique, ce n’était pas aussi bon »

«Tuer pour éviter d'être tué», Québec Rock, April 1984

Pink Floyd was in the midst of completing the 1975 « Wish You Were Here » album when David Gilmour came across a youthful singer-songwriter named Kate Bush. Through his patronage, she made her first demo, and Bush’s celebrated career was underway.

27.06.1975 Roger Waters stayed in Canada to meet Bob Ezrin at Toronto. First rough ideas about « Walls ». The bassist made some confidence to a Canadian reporter about this idea. It was reported some years later in the French press:


« Les gens s’illusionnent en croyant qu’il n’y a pas de mur entre l’artiste sur scène et le public dans la salle alors j’ai indiqué que ce serait bien d’en construire un en polyester noir, ou quelque chose comme cela »

« Pink Floyd au pied du mur », Le matin de Paris, 8 August 1980


And he presented the idea of the album in the back of a limousine in Hamilton, Ontario, in 1975 when they did that infamous Ivor Wynne stadium show in the residential area...


Bob Ezrin

« That's right! And I guess a year and a half later or something like that I got a phone call seeing if I wanted to come over and listen to some new material and there it was — The Wall. (…) At first it was completely autobiographical — it was all about Roger, and I frankly didn't think that the world was interested in the emotional history of a 36-year-old rock star. Especially then, when 36 was old! And at that point, there were no older rock stars — very few, like Chuck Berry and people like that. So, with its references to war and things like that — it put an era on Roger that in a sense just alienated him even further from the audience because they couldn't identify with that experience at all. What we had to do was create a character who spanned all the way from the war up till the present and into the future. And, of course they already had Pink, you know, in earlier albums and we just decided that he was good enough. So we decided to resurrect him, give him some "flesh". Roger began using that as his model and began to create composites of people that he knew, and places that he had been and ideas that he had for the real "high character" songs. But the thing that was the key to bringing it all together for me was a template that I wrote in the form of a script — literally a script, called The Wall. It started off with Act One, Scene One, which described the action — described the bomb falling that never hits but explodes into a baby's cry and we go into the first song ["In The Flesh?"]. 

What I did was to take the material that we had and sequence it in a way that it really made not just thematic but dramatic sense too. It became obvious that things were missing when you did that. It was kind of like lining up a bunch of photographs and saying, "Here, this is telling the story" and there were some steps missing between photograph 4 and photograph 5 and it was obvious that there was something that had to have happen to get you there. So I would write a scene that would say what the action was but not which song it was. It would simply say, "to be written". And that became the framework from which we began to build the record. We already had some songs that we were working on in the studio — but the script was sort of the breakthrough because it gave us the blueprint for what we had to accomplish and also gave us a sense of how long it was going to take. (…) 

It was a very linear process, and then it just became a matter of finding the songs that were the ones that were to be written, and executing the ones that were already written. Now, in recording, we would cut a guide track with a vocal and an instrument — a guitar, piano, drum loop or something like that — for the format of the song. We knew what the song was going to be, and then we would overdub everything onto the guide track, and flesh it out and give it the sound and vibe we were looking for »

« Bob Ezrin: Producing Pink Floyd, Kiss & Peter Gabriel », TapeOps, September 2002

Storm works for the Knebworth’ festival poster

28.06.1975 Ivor Wynne Stadium, Ontario, Canada

« By the thousands, they lined up the day before the concert with their $8.50 general admission tickets. And when the turnstiles finally stopped, more than 55,000 fans deluged Ivor Wynne Stadium for the most infamous rock concert in the city's history. It was the final night of the North American Wish You Were Here tour in 1975, and the city was not up to the challenge of hosting such an event in a facility that was designed for far fewer people. Neighbours of Ivor Wynne were not impressed with all-night partying and damage to their properties. Nor were they appreciative of open drug use and the collateral effects of a shortage of port-a-potties »

« June 28, 1975: British rock band Pink Floyd brings out 55,000 to Hamilton’s Ivor Wynne Stadium », The Hamilton Spectator, 23 September 2016


This concert is a great event for the city with a record audience and a lot of excesses with many police arrests.

Late June Following arguments and his dependance to the heroin, Peter Watts left the management of the band and Floyd to USA. almost one year later, he will found dead.

JULY 1975

5 July 1975 « Knebworth Festival », Knebworth Park, Stevenage, England

Pictures by « Best » (left) and by Danny CLIFFORD (right)

The Knebworth Festival will be the final date for the 1975 tour (later renamed «Wish you were Here» tour). This festival was an event by many ways. This was the first time the band has played in England for a year. It was also the last live version of «Dark Side of the Moon» with Roger Waters. This was the only time the band played Have a Cigar with Roy Harper.

Graham Edgar (Audience member):

« The start was fairly slow , or so it seemed at the time , with technical problems & poor sound .Once Shine On got into its stride & Roy Harper contributed to Have A Cigar , it was beginning to build into something special . As darkness fell , the lights & animated show on the large circular screen began to be effective . Dark Side was played in its entirety followed by the inevitable Echoes , which seemed , to my ears to last forever & just got better as it went on . The Fireworks , the lights , the film show & the funny little rocket which came from the back of the site along what seemed like a washing line ,all added to the experience, as the idea of pyrotechnics & such were pretty much in their infancy.

After staggering to the campsite we had absolutely no energy left to erect the tent , so we just used it as a duvet & slept blissfully until being awoken by car horns & people throwing up. - Time to go home . With the passing of time the memories have become maybe a bit more favourable than things really were & if I heard the recordings now I would probably be hugely disappointed , so I'll rely on my hazy recollection of what was , to me , a classic day »

« Knebworth 1975 - Memoirs of the attendees », UKRockfestivals website.


Anonymous audience member:

«This was my second visit to Knebworth, after seeing the Allman Brothers headline at the first festival in 1974. A group of mates had organised a coach to take us down there; it left on the Friday night (after closing time of course) from outside the Londonderry pub and got us to the site in the early hours of Saturday morning. The line-up for the day was pretty strong, but we were all there to see the Floyd play «Dark Side of the Moon». Attendance was much higher than the previous year, there seemed to be a lot of people there. Ticket price was a bargain at £2.75 (...) There was then a long wait before Floyd came on. Soon two spitfires were flying overhead to herald Floyd’s arrival on stage. The show was similar to that which I had seen at Newcastle Odeon a year previously; they had their large circular screen, and the first half of their set featured new songs which would ultimately appear on «Wish You Were Here» and «Animals». The second half was «Dark Side of the Moon», with Echoes as the encore. Just before the start of «Dark Side of the Moon» a plane flew down over the crowd (travelling down a wire from the lighting tower) and crashed into the stage. And then came the familiar opening voice «I’ve been mad for f***ing years, absolutely years» … and the haunting laughter and we were off, witnessing the last performance of «Dark Side of the Moon» by the Floyd with Roger Waters. It would be another 30 years until I saw this line-up play some of it again at Live 8 in Hyde Park; but that’s a story for a few days time (…)»

«Pink Floyd at the Knebworth festival. knebworth Park, 5th July 1975», Vintagerock Website, 22 January 2014

« Para o Pink Floyd, concertos ao ar livre sempre foram ótimas transapóes. "O único grilo", diz o baterista Nick Manos, "é que ternos urna forte tendencia a pro-duzir chuva Mesmo guando a regido enfrenta seca braba ..." Mas, desta vez, no Knebworth Park de Londres, as vibracties estavam ótimas, as nuvens que flutuavam no céu permaneceram sarna boa e tudo saiu direitinho. Anima de tudo, é claro, havia muna expectativa. A morada es-tava curiosa, fissurada, querendo saber corno o Pink la dar se-qüencia ao seu importante traba-lho depois do estrondoso sucesso, em disco e ao vivo, do Dark Sida of the Moon (A Face Escura da Lua). O que ja se sabia, de novida-de, é que havia novos filmes e tres músicas recentes (Shine on You Crazy Diamond, Raving and Orco-ling e Gotta Be Crazy) no reper-tório do show. E nada mais. Ou, 

corno disse um carinha que espe-rara pacientemente pelo show: "Do Pink Floyd a gente sempre tem que esperar tudo mais". E nessa imite, realmente, tudo acontecen. Durante duas horas, Roger Waters, David Gilmour, Rick Wrigtrt e Nick Mason promo-veram um clima de viagem espa-cial no parque e fizeram a mopada viajar tranqüilamente através dos universos desconhecidos de seas próprias cabepas. Na primeira parte do show, o grupo deixou fluir várias músicas de seu novo álbum, o que funcionou como urna excitante sucessáo de sur-presas para a morada. Depois de um breve intervalo, comepou o que urna garota ho-landesa chamou de "um grande v8o cósmico". E neo podía ser de outra forma, pois foi al que o Pink Floyd levou todo mundo para a Face Escura da Lua. Durante uma hora, os sons mais incríveis salram do palco e foram conduzindo o público aos limites do espapo cósmico. No fim, guando a música estava atingindo o clímax, um grande aviáo de metal den um rasante sobre o público e espati-fou-se contra o fundo do palco, espalhando Togo. A viagem de exploracáo á face escura da Lua tinha terminado. E do palco co-meparam a se espalhar os sons reverberantes de Echoes (Ecos), um dos mais intrigantes clássicos do Pink Flyd. O ritual estava com-pleto. Guando a música terminou e os caras do Pink salan) calma-mente do palco, os sons ficaram ecoando na cabeca de toda a mopada. Todos se levantaram em siláncio e comeparam a cami-nhada de volta para casa ou para a estrada, enquanto a face ilumi-nada da Lua banhava o Kneb-worth com urna luz dourada, fantástica como a própria música do Pink »

« Pink Floyd Um ritual de som emagia », Pop Magazine, August 1975


«No-one could argue that the Knebworth Festival was not the outdoor event of the year. It proved to hi* an almost complete contrast to the disappointing Crystal Palace Garden Party and even eclipsed Elton John's Wembley bash. An excellent bill that built comfortably to a spectacular climax with Pink Floyd. Still, it goes without saying that any bill featuring the Floyd will like a success. (…) It was beginning to get chilly and dark when the Pink Floyd hit the stage. As they did. two camouflaged Spitfires flew low overhead — a foretaste of the special effects to come. It was Floyd's day really; most of the fans had come to see them, the stage was crammed with their goodies and the t-shirts and badges on sale in the grounds were for them. They didn’t let anyone down; the show was highly professional, very entertaining and what the fans wanted.

They used the set as a vehicle for introducing their new albums. two numbers being performed. They were You Gotta Re Crazy and Have A Cigar — both are in a similar style to «Dark Side Of The Moon» but weren't as immediate; they need listening to a few times. Roy Harper joined in on Have A Cigar Their sound was very good throughout; their own PA being augmented by three other 24 Kilowatt p.a. stations on towers amongst the audience. 

This meant that when they featured any special sound effects they could encircle the audience with sound — like all their 'specials’ it worked beautifully. The first set finished with Shine On You Crazy Diamond and 40 rockets being set off from the front of the stage; the show being planned so that it was dark by then.The second set was composed entirely of the album «Dark Side Of The Moon» and it was here that the back projection screen came into use. This is a huge circular screen where images and films are projected with great precision and relevance to the music. When Money was being performed we saw great piles of coins tumbling and tapes of cash registers going off. All these goings on didn’t distract from the music; they highlighted it and added so much to the show.

Because the show was in the open air they could be more adventurous with their fireworks — when the model aircraft comes slowly landing on the stage a huge fountain of flares and rockets burst from the top of the stage; it was one great pyrotechnic delight after another and with the audience popping off flash bulbs fires and their own rockets one was continually being bombarded with lights from all angles — quite an experience. The second set finished and the hand went off stage. Dave Gilmour could be seen calmly walking about back stage having a drink — as if he had been a spectator rather than a performer. They were, of course, called back for an encore and they dutifully performed Echoes from the album «Meddle». Here everybody got to their feet and 'got off forgetting about worries of how they were getting home. The band finished and left, not to return again; the fans had got their money’s worth. It was evident that The Pink Floyd are better in the outdoor events; they can play to a bigger audience and they can use virtually every trick in the book, imagine two Spitfire's flying through Earls Court!»

«Knebworth - Floyd shine on», Disc & Music Echo, July 1975

Photographies by Michael STOCKER

«(…) Car ils étaient venus pour le Pink Floyd, ces dizaines de milliers de jeunes gens arborant leurs jeans rapiécés. Subitement. alors même que le Pink Floyd prenait possession de la scène, ils semblaient encore plus nombreux et surtout plus attentifs. Aucun mouvement de flux et reflux comme précédemment, mais une mer silencieuse de gens venus pour « planer » avec les maîtres du genre. Un public à l'image physique du Floyd. Où sont-ils. en effet, les quatre dandies des débuts qui. même après le départ de Syd Barrett et son remplacement par l'ami de toujours David Gilmour, avaient su garder cette o touch of class»? Est-ce leur laisser-aller qui a agi par mimétisme sur le public, ou bien le Floyd qui a décidé de se confondre avec son public, toujours est-il que nos quatre stars n'en ont plus guère que les royalties et pas l'allure. Mais peut-être est-ce tout simplement cela le secret de leur extraordinaire succès. Car entendons-nous bien, il est difficile de rayer de quelques frappes de machine à écrire toute une œuvre passée. Disons plutôt que l'inspiration est partie et qu'il reste le savoir-faire servi par des moyens techniques impressionnants et idéaux.

En effet, pour ce concert-événement de Knebworth. le premier donné en Angleterre depuis de nombreux mois, et cela au retour d'une énorme tournée américaine, le Floyd avait sorti le grand jeu : système quadriphonique. environnement lumineux somptueux avec un disque argent tournant, les traditionnelles fumées et. c'était la grande surprise, des feux d'artifice tout au long du show et, fin du fin. subitement un avion illuminé survolant la foule puis venant s'écraser sur le fond de la scène en faisant exploser une immense gerbe d'étincelles dans un vacarme impressionnant. Le Pink Floyd donnait là, encore une fois, la preuve de son professionnalisme. de ce goût devenu célèbre « d'en donner pour son argent ». Mais c'est justement là que le bât blesse: on s'ennuie devant ce qui est devenu un ensemble de clichés, certes magnifiquement présentés, mais clichés tout de même.... et Eux !

Et pourtant, pour ce concert de Knebworth, le Floyd proposa de nouvelles compositions. et surtout un traitement différent de certaines de celles que nous ne connaissons que trop. Des nouvelles compositions qui seront dans le tout prochain album qui sortira cet automne, près de trois ans après « Dark Side Of The Moon ». et dont certaines nous sont connues comme « Raving And Drooling », « Gotta Be Crazy » et « Shine On You Crazy Diamond ». dédié à Syd Barrett. Connues parce que le Floyd les a jouées en public en Angleterre lors de sa dernière tournée et qu’elles figurent sur un disque pirate / best seller qui circule à Londres. Disons, sans être trop violemment partial, que tous ces nouveaux titres ne brillent guère par leur originalité: des vocaux de David Gilmour et/ou Roger Waters. un traitement très carré de la mélodie auquel est donnée la fameuse coloration science-fiction-mystique par l'orgue et les bruits enregistrés. Roy Harper se joindra aussi au Floyd pour assurer les vocaux d'une do ces nouvelles compositions. Le seul plaisir que l’on peut prendre à l'écoute de ces nouvelles pièces vient surtout de l'extraordinaire machinerie de reproduction qui donne au son une dimension qu'il n'a pas vraiment. Il y eut aussi, nous l'avons dit. un effort pour modifier/arranger/diversifier/rajeunir les célèbres compositions que le Floyd rejouait sans cesse avec de plus en plus de lassitude. Il y aura ainsi des digressions jazzy grâce au piano électrique joué aussi bien par Rick Wright que par David Gilmour. par l'adjonction aussi d'un saxophone et de deux chanteuses noires. Du jazz, du gospel, un lyrisme grandiloquent, ça sonnait parfois, tenez-vous bien, comme du Magma, ou plutôt du Zao. Le public on fut d'ailleurs quelque peu surpris, lui qui était venu pour reprendre en chœur « Money » et qui voyait son hit partir dans une direction tout à à fait différente. Un public que l'on pourrait dire plus populaire qu'en France, où le Pink Floyd est essentiellement le groupe chéri des lycéens, des cadres moyens et des programmateurs/assistants de radio qui trouvent cette musique idéale comme fond sonore aussi bien pour montrer un paysage industriel ou un cycliste au ralenti que pour une émission scientifique ou littéraire.

En Angleterre, le Pink Floyd est « tout public », comme on dit « tout terrain ». capable de mettre dans sa poche cosmico-fantastique tous les jeunes kids. de ceux qui veulent être modernes, culturels, à ceux qui veulent de l'émotion â bon marché. Il était d'ailleurs impressionnant de I I voir dans la nuit qu'illuminaient quelques k| feux de bois à la périphérie, et cette tache L] tour à tour violette, jaune, orangée, cou- H verte d'étoiles tourbillonnantes ou plongée dans la pénombre qu'était la scène. H ce grand tapis de corps recueillis recevant H les sons comme la jouissance dernière II avant le grand châtiment. L'heure était à la gravité, au plaisir intérieur, secret. Bizarre ! Surtout que l'enthousiasme ne Q semble pas avoir réintégré le clan du Floyd qui avec ce concert disait un petit adieu, le groupe se retirant de la scène pour de nombreux mois. Pour la petite 1 histoire, sachez qu'ils jouèrent « Dark Side » presque entièrement, notamment Time. The Great Gig In The Sky (avec notamment les deux chanteuses). Pour ceux qui étaient venus voir le Floyd. c'était évident, ce fut grandiose, un son et lumière pour kermesse pop très réussie, avec feux d'artifices, projecteurs striant la nuit, et le murmure approbateur de la grande foule qui crie : « more »»

«Blue Floyd», Rock & Folk, August 1975.


« Knebworth happened. As expected, the Pink Floyd played for two hours to climax a day that saw Linda Lewis bubble and bounce, Roy Harper bring us down and up in that order (…) And on to the Pink Floyd who. after all, seemed to be In charge or the day's events, providing the stage and PA and whose contract also stipulated tho presence of a back-stage, « facility that, promoter Fred Bannister would otherwise have eschewed. There was a long delay before the Floyd arrived while the mechanics of their production were mobilized:    the    giant circular screen, the lofty lighting towers, the three articulated trucks that carried their sound system and finally the brace of Spitfires that passed overhead.

Their set was divided, as usual, into two halves, the First offering the newer, unrecorded material that one assumes will form tho basis of their next album, and the second devoted to " Dark Side Of The Noon " in its entirely, followed, again as usual, by " Echoes " as an encore. In short, the first part was poor. " Dark Side " hit occasional high and " Echoes " was pretty superb Tuning problems hampered the early songs and Roger Waters hit many a bum note in his vocals as the group labored along with what appeared to be little enthusiasm for the event.

With the darkness falling, they appeared to gain new life and Crazy Diamond, the last of the three early songs, picked up as their lighting columns bathed the band In a sea of colors.

At last it seemed as if an Event would happen. A model plane on a wire heralded the onset of '* Dark Side " which picked up as it went along, a majestic piece of music that the group must be over-familiar with by now. Nevertheless, Any Color You Like developed into a tremendous jam, Dave Gilmour especially shining on his Stratocaster trading line* with Waters and Wright that moved through a spectrum of ideas not contained on the record. The closing two songs, unfortunately. suffered again through Waters* vocals and It limped, rather than romped, to it's usually stunning climax.At a rough estimate, that's the sixth time I've seen the Floyd play this piece over the last three years. I love it dearly and still play the album regularly when the mood is right, and it would be nice to say that the live rendering has improved with age.

Truth of the matter is that I honestly enjoyed It the most when I first heard it at tho Rainbow in 1973 — or was it 72 ? — when the piece was still in the formative stages.

Echoes, as stated, ended the day and practicably this was played flawlessly. Hy last recollection, apart from the two-hour wait to move my immobile motor car through the insane traffic jam, is dancing with a total stranger. <an intoxicated colored girl, on the stage while dry-ice circulated around mv feet and lower shins. Ever looked down and wondered where your legs are? It's an eerie feeling. Yes. Knebworth happened»

«Plane sailing for the Floyd», Melody Maker, 12 July 1975

Photographies by Henriette BANNISTER (left) and Michael PUTLAND (right)

« No-one could argue that the Knebworth Festival was not the outdoor event of the year. It proved to hi* an almost complete contrast to the disappointing Crystal Palace Garden Party and even eclipsed Elton John's Wembley bash. An excellent bill that built comfortably to a spectacular climax with Pink Floyd. Still, it goes without saying that any bill featuring the Floyd will like a success.

(…) It was beginning to get chilly and dark when the Pink Floyd hit the stage. As they did. two camouflaged Spitfires flew low overhead — a foretaste of the special effects to come. It was Floyd's day really; most of the fans had come to see them, the stage was crammed with their goodies and the t-shirts and badges on sale in the grounds were for them. They didn’t let anyone down; the show was highly professional, very entertaining and what the fans wanted.

They used the set as a vehicle for introducing their new albums. two numbers being performed. They were You Gotta Re Crazy and Have A Cigar — both are in a similar style to "Dark Side Of The Moon” but weren't as immediate; they need listening to a few times. Roy Harper joined in on Have A Cigar Their sound was very good throughout; their own PA being augmented by three other 24 Kilowatt p.a. stations on towers amongst the audience.  This meant that when they featured any special sound effects they could encircle the audience with sound — like all their 'specials’ it worked beautifully. The first set finished with Shine On You Crazy Diamond and 40 rockets being set off from the front of the stage; the show being planned so that it was dark by then.

The second set was composed entirely of the album “Dark Side Of The Moon" and it was here that the back projection screen came into use. This is a huge circular screen where images and films are projected with great precision and relevance to the music. When Money was being performed we saw great piles of coins tumbling and tapes of cash registers going off. All these goings on didn’t distract from the music; they highlighted it and added so much to the show. Because the show was in the open air they could be more adventurous with their fireworks — when the model aircraft comes slowly landing on the stage a huge fountain of flares and rockets burst from the top of the stage; it was one great pyrotechnic delight after another and with the audience popping off flash bulbs fires and their own rockets one was continually being bombarded with lights from all angles — quite an experience.

The second set finished and the hand went off stage. Dave Gilmour could be seen calmly walking about back stage having a drink — as if he had been a spectator rather than a performer. They were, of course, called back for an encore and they dutifully performed Echoes from the album "Meddle". Here everybody got to their feet and 'got off forgetting about worries of how they were getting home. The band finished and left, not to return again; the fans had got their money’s worth.

It was evident that The Pink Floyd are better in the outdoor events; they can play to a bigger audience and they can use virtually every trick in the book, imagine two Spitfire's flying through Earls Court! »

« Knebworth - Floyd shine on », Disc & Music Echo, July 1975


« This was my second visit to Knebworth, after seeing the Allman Brothers headline at the first festival in 1974. A group of mates had organised a coach to take us down there; it left on the Friday night (after closing time of course) from outside the Londonderry pub and got us to the site in the early hours of Saturday morning. The line-up for the day was pretty strong, but we were all there to see the Floyd play Dark Side of the Moon. Attendance was much higher than the previous year, there seemed to be a lot of people there. Ticket price was a bargain at £2.75 (one day I really must try to do a comparison with today’s prices) (...) There was then a long wait before Floyd came on. Soon two spitfires were flying overhead to herald Floyd’s arrival on stage. The show was similar to that which I had seen at Newcastle Odeon a year previously; they had their large circular screen, and the first half of their set featured new songs which would ultimately appear on Wish You Were Here and Animals. The second half was Dark Side of the Moon, with Echoes as the encore. Just before the start of Dark Side of the Moon a plane flew down over the crowd (travelling down a wire from the lighting tower) and crashed into the stage. And then came the familiar opening voice « I’ve been mad for f***ing years, absolutely years » … and the haunting laughter and we were off, witnessing the last performance of Dark Side of the Moon by the Floyd with Roger Waters. It would be another 30 years until I saw this line-up play some of it again at Live 8 in Hyde Park; but that’s a story for a few days time (…) »

« Pink Floyd at the Knebworth festival. knebworth Park, 5th July 1975 », Vintagerock Website, 22 January 2014

Mason:

« We finally rushed back lo England on a completely crazed timetable for a technically challenged show at Knebworth. Time was too short or we were too frazzled. Part of the problem was that the generators were unstabilised. During the afternoon it became clear that all Rick’s electric keyboards needed retuning. However, we managed to miss the significance of this and as darkness fell and our stage lights were operated. Rick’s keyboards were changing pitch in unison with the sound. It sounded awful It transpired that every time the master volume was turned up. the keyboards went out of tune. Below the stage. Phil Taylor. Robbie Williams and the technician from the generator company, in a scene reminiscent of Das Boot, strove to chum round the generator handle in an attempt to control the damage Phil recalls that their efforts were ‘manful, but hopeless’ as the keyboards continued to sec-saw between sharp and Hat.

Rick walked off in despair at one point, and somehow or another we staggered through the show using only one piano and one less sensitive keyboard, and a more modest light show. Yet although we were painfully aware of the technical problems below and on stage, we managed to distract the audience with a great effect, when -instead of using model planes as we had done on other shows - we managed to co-ordinate a fly-past by two original Spitfires low over the crowd as the show opened »

« Inside out: a personal history of Pink Floyd », Nick Mason, 2005

Nick Mason photographied at Knebworth by Michael PUTLAND.

The event caused significant media coverage throughout the World press.

From left to right: « Bravo », July 1975 (Germany); « Melody Maker », 12 July 1975 (England); « Sounds », 12 July 1975 (USA) and « Rock and Folk », August 1975 (France).

The first participation of the band at this festival should have coincided with the release of « Wish you were here» who will be finally delayed many times (see below).

June advert (left), July advert (right)

July 1975, the band back to EMI Studios for the last recording sessions for « Wish you were here »

Rick Wright photographied by Jill FURMANOVSKY.

Articles in the « New Musical Express » and « Cashbox » are devoted to the bootlegs’ phenomenon. Pink Floyd seems to be first hit by the illicit albums market.

Left: New Musical Express, 7 June 1975. Right: Cashbox 19 July 1975.

On 7th July, the band back to the studios for additional sessions for « Wish you were here ».  Syd made a second visit to his former bandmates. It will be the last time.


« On 7 July, during a break in the Wish You Were Here sessions (…) Syd tale takes on another curious twist. In conversation with Mojo magazine in 2006, Gilmour disputed any stories that Syd had attended his wedding. Yet at least three of the guests claim they saw Syd at a post-wedding meal at Abbey Road.  Ex-manager Andrew King recalled Barrett looking ‘like the type of bloke who serves you in a hamburger bar in Kansas City’. Humble Pie drummer Jerry Shirley referred to him as ‘an overweight Hare Krishna-type chap’ »

« Pigs might fly », Mark Blake, 2006


Nick Mason:

« Phil Taylor thinks with some justification that he came again the next day, because he's uncovered a couple of Polaroids where Syd's dressed in something else. He certainly didn't bring a trousseau with him »

« Dark globe », Uncut, May 2020


Ginger Gilmour:

« While clearing his throat, the registrar leaned over towards David and said, "Excuse me, Sir, the ring?" We both looked at each other with a look of...OH NO. I had waited all my life for this moment and we had forgotten to get a ring! Linnie came up to us from behind and offered for us to use a ring she had gotten from a box of Crackerjacks. An American sweet popcorn, which always had a surprise gift inside and she had just happened to eat on the way. God was on our side, even if we didn't realize it. David eventually had a ring designed in white gold with two interlocking hearts by a friend who was a designer of jewelry. The registrar did turn a few shades of red at the thought but proceeded. When the words, "You may put the ring on her finger" was said, neither of us knew which finger or which hand David should put it on. Once my embarrassment settled, I remembered that it was the fourth finger but not which hand. Boy, were we well rehearsed. I had both fourth fingers up. We both teetered between them as we tried to get it right and hold our pride intack. Linnie said in a low whisper trying to say it just low enough for us to hear, "The right one, the right one." David looked relieved and chose the right. Phew, at last we heard the words, "You may kiss the bride." We all went on to celebrate at our local pub with a giggle and good cheer. What a tale, it has made a sweet story ever since and brought smiles to my kids' faces many years later. David had to go to Abbey Road to continue recording Wish You Were Here. I went with him so that we could share the day together. The band had no idea until we walked in. There always seem to be stories within stories in our life. You will see why as you read further. Just to add to the day's event, when we arrived, Roger walked up to David pulling him aside and whispered to him, "Look who is sitting on the sofa." They both went slowly over to the place Roger was referring, Nick and Rick following discreetly. There is a huge sofa in front of the mixing desk in that EMI recording room. I don't think any of them were completely certain who was sitting there until David confirmed it. David looked and his face clouded over with the reality of what he saw. Under his breath, he said, "It's Sid." The atmosphere in the room went silent as they digested the moment. Roger, especially, who is quoted to have had many mixed emotions for the past came flooding back. There was Sid pear shape, hairless and overweight. They stood silently in disbelief. Old memories rushed into their hearts. What happened? His timing was uncanny! Their lost love and the tragedy of Sid inspired the creation of "Shine On". And there they were in the middle of recording it when Sid appeared weather worn and without hair. They stumbled to have a conversation, inviting him to listen to a track. Sid just sat there lost, on the sofa, wondering why? What a day to ponder. What a day to Remember »

« Memoirs of the Bright Side of the Moon », Ginger Gilmour, 2015.


Interviewer: «The day Syd showed up, can you recall if any photos were taken ? Were there many people there when it happened ? »

Venetta Fields: « I think there were photos taken at that time..I remember telling someone that was showing me a photo. I can’t remember who? I may even have a picture. We took a lot of pictures that day. They had been at the studio for hours before we got there.  I think that while we were there, Syd came into the studio. Everything stopped. We were all shocked to see him and the way he looked. Even though Carlena and I had never seen him before.   He looked as if he were on medication. He was dazed. He didn’t say anything while the session was going on. He just listened. I think no one knew what to say to him. The vibe was tense for a few minutes, but then we got back to work. Syd stayed for a while and then left »

« An Interview With Venetta Fields », A Fleeting Glimpse, March 2004

The same day, David Gilmour married with Ginger.

Project for the cover based on the absence thematic. Picture by Hipgnosis

Storm Thorgerson:

« This mirror image was the first idea Hipgnosis photographed for the Wish you were here cover, depicting on absent lover, ie not visible/present in the mirror, only present in his mind... weird - not (…) Fortunately it was superseded by better ideas and better shots ... whereas the business man in the desert opposite, though superseded too, was a front runner for ages and was finally relegoted only by mere preference, a preference for the finol version on the front of this box set - similar fate, wholly dissimilar process »

« With you were here - Immersion » booklet


« Pink Floyd first talked about this sleeve on their West Coast Tour in April’75. At that point there was no particular brief because they didn’t have a clear idea of what they were going to do. Shine on you crazy Diamond was definite but the rest was undecided. Shine on began as an introspective piece, a haunting fro bars from Dave and a lyric from Roger. The words were about Syd Barrett but as the work progressed they became more universal, more about unfulfilled presence in general rather than about Syd’s particular version of it - and he certainly had all his own brand. This notion of a presence not really there, of the ways that people pretend to be present whilst their minds are elsewhere, the devices employed psychologically by persons to withhold the full force of their presence and their motivations for doing so, all boiled down t a single theme - absence. the absence of a person, the absence of feeling (…) Two whole months passed and it was still not cracked. I’d returned from the tour by this time and we were having plenty of late night discussions about it. I’d been searching for a metaphor or a powerful symbol of absence. I was especially interested by that aspect of absence, something allegedly genuine but that was as phony as a Nixon denial!Roger was particularly critical of the music business at this time (Have a cigar) and I finally came with a handshake »

Unreleased page from « In the Pink » project book, 1975.

AUGUST 1975

First rumors in the French press about the involvement of Pink Floyd on the French adaptation of « Dune » by Jodorowsky (see this page for more details)

Articles published in « Gold » and « France Soir »

Brian Humphries (sound engineer):

« It's just at the talking stages at present. Jodorowsky'snext film will be «Dune», and he came to London to meet and hear the band in the studio. If we do it, it will mean at least a month in the Sahara with a mobile unit, because that's where Jodorowsky is shooting the film. He wants to film to the Floyd's music, so we'll be marooned for a while doing that, but it is an exciting challenge»

«PinkFloyd: more gritty, less giddy », Circus magazine, September 1975.

Perhaps due to the «hell development» of «Dune», the group take a long break from August 1975. Their immediate plans are to invest the considerable money they have due to the success of TDS and the American tour in a recording, storage and production complex that can be rented to other groups.

Mason :

« Il y eut même un moment où nous avions décidé de prendre une année de liberté et de faire des choses chacun de notre côté parce que nous nous ennuyions vraiment entre nous. Et puis, comme toujours, il est arrivé quelque chose que nous avions tous envie de faire. C’était en l’occurrence pour la musique de « Dune ». Le projet ne risque pas de se réaliser maintenant, mais sur le moment, nous nous y sommes tous mis, préférant faire cela ensemble plutôt que des albums solos ».

« Your Mother didn’t like this », Capital Radio, December 1976.

Gilmour’s family and friends

SEPTEMBER 1975

12 September 1975 Pink Floyd's new album, « Wish You Were Here », is released in the UK. The album reached No. 1.

13 September 1975 « Wish You Were Here » is released in the US, where it reached No. 1.

The appearance of Syd Barrett during the « Wish you were here » sessions is already well-know by the fans (Bernard White) and some reporters as for the « New Musical Express ».


« Stories, you see, have once again been circulating concerning first of all the rather bizarre reunion betwixt the Pink Floyd and their Founding Father at E.M.I.’s Abbey Road studios, where the former were to be found working on the final mixes of « Wish You Were Here » One source for example claims that a "very together” Barrett helped out on the mixing of “Shine On You Crazy Diamond”, while innumerable other accounts — without the luxury of any real details — still feel it necessary to inject a quotient of hearty rejoicing that Syd was back with “his band” insinuating ever-so-tenuously that this might presage « a return to activity ». We-e-ell. The real facts concerning this reunion are pretty much as follows. The Floyd were setting about their mixing in, one presumes, their usual workmanlike fashion, when Barrett suddenly appeared, wandering into proceedings as if such an appearance warranted not one dint of surprise to be registered »

« Is it possible that Syd Barrett … », New Musical Express, September 1975

16 September, Roger Waters is invited by Jean-Michel Desjeunes on the Europe 1 show « tout peut arriver » for the release of « Wish you were here »


Waters

« I’ve just done an interview for French radio, about a month and half ago, and it was a kind of farce. Because they weren’t interested. there wasn’t any common ground »

« Pink Floyd », Street Life, November 1975

All photos by Claude GASSIAN

All photos by Claude GASSIAN

OCTOBER 1975

October 1975, The divorce between Roger and Judy is pronounced.

Photographed in Japan on August 1971.

October 1975, « Wish you were here » is certified platinum in USA (vinyl and cassette).

NOVEMBER 1975

28 November 1975, Nick Mason gives a concert with Gary Windo at the College of Art in Maidstone, Kent,

1976 DAY-BY-DAY

Rich Brunton, Bill MacCormick, Laurie Allan and Nick photographied by Pamela WINDO

JANUARY 1976

January 1976: David Gilmour produces « Disco Dancer/Easy » single by Unicorn

January 1976, Mason mixes « The Hapless Child & Other stories » of Michael Mantler

January 1976, the band receive a Platinum Record Disc for « Wish you were Here » in Canada. At the same time,

Nicky Hornes begins his serie of interviews for the forthcoming Capital Radio special show (later subtitled « Your Mother didn’t like this »).

FEBRUARY 1976

February 1976, « CashBox » and « Rock & Folk » stated the band has decided to drop the « Dark Side of the Moon » set for their future tour. They’re currently following the development of the French project « Dune » for which they are committed to providing the music. According Steve, if the footage don’t start around April, they will working on an album on their own.

First home video release (Betamax format) of « Live at Pompeii » by the Japan company Toy (property of Sony)

The Scarfe's original works for « Animals » are shelved by the group for a more realistic approach. See this page for more details.

MARCH 1976

In March, the band receive a gold record for « Wish you were here » in Germany

From left to right: Helmut Fest, Roger Waters, Rick Wright and Klaus Werner.

The « Live at Pompeii » is first shown in Spain on March.

6 March 1976 « Sounds » dedicated an article titled « The Floyd Tapes » about the forthcoming « Your mother didn't like it » radio show.

APRIL 1976

On 1st April 1976, many Gilmour’s guitars are robbed during home jacking for 6 500£

April 1976, The band negociates a deal with CBS/Columbia Records for the US markets for $1 million (former EMI/Capitol). This contrat help the band to acquire a new building at 35 Britannia Row in London for his recording studios and warehouse space.

installation of equipment in the new group's buildings

Later April, the band begin to work on his future album in their own studios.

MAY - JUNE 1976

Steve O'Rourke go to France to settle the next tour. He received a Gold Tape For 120,000 unit sales of « Dark Side » by the CEO of Pathé Marconi EMI France.

David, Ginger and the new-born Alice are photographed at their Roydon’s house by Storm Thorgerson

David, Alice and Ginger photographied in 1976 by Storm THORGERSON

Ginger Gilmour:

« This is a picture of me and my then husband David Gilmour, the Pink Floyd guitarist, and our newly born daughter Alice, at Woodley, our home in Roydon, Essex, in 1976. It was taken by Storm Thorgerson, who designed all the classic Pink Floyd album covers. He took some other pictures that day of me holding Alice, and because he was a friend who had known David since they were at university, I think he captured something very beautiful and touching. For both of us, having our first child was the epitome of happiness. We were so blissed out with Alice »

« The Bright Side of the Moon », Ginger Gilmour, 2014.

Early May 1976 Peter Watts come back in England after his rehab.

8 May 1976 David Gilmour give an exclusive interview to Melody Maker for the article «Soundcheck».

The French press devotes many headlines to the Jodorowsky’s project: the adaptation of « Dune » with a lot of details about the participation of the group.

Rock & Folk issue 112, May 1976

June management and the group reflect on concert dates next year. Roger asked that this tour not last 6 months


« Planning became last June, when it became clear that neither Olympia nor Earl’s Court, the favored venues, were going to be available. A band that can sell 40,000 seats and still have people queuing outside all night in the rain, obviously has a limited number of places it can play ».

« Welcome to the machines », Melody Maker, 26 March 1977

JULY 1976

July 1976 the group takes action to fight against bootlegs


« A temporary court order was granted by a judge yesterday prohibiting a man taking, selling or offering for sale records made from live performances by five rock bands without their written consent. The petition was brought before Lord Grieve in a court in Edinburgh by Bad Company, Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, Elton John, Jethro Tull, and four record companies against Mr Dougie J. Robb, of Doon Place. They alleged that Mr Robb advertised for sale imported recordings of live performances made without the written consent of the performers »

« Order against alleged bootlegger », Canberra Times, 22 July 1976

Recording of « The Animals » take a turn with a drastic change of concept

Gilmour: 

« Animals started with those two numbers which we wrote. Roger had another song which had a different title but it was about pigs. And having written ‘Pigs’ he then looked again at the songs ‘Raving and Drooling’ and ‘You Gotta Be Crazy’ and realised how close they were to an animals concept ... And then, having already recorded most of ‘Dogs’ ... and most of ‘Raving and Drooling’, changed the lyrics slightly here and there and tailored it in more. We then did some extra bits and effects and stuff to change it all into that concept »

Innerview, radio interview by Jim Ladd, June 1978


Roger waters:

« I’ve had the idea of Animals in the back of mind for many years – many years. It's a kind of old chestnut, really. Sometime in the middle of the recording, it seemed like the right thing to tie it all together. It gave me the lead to rewrite the lyrics. [Before then] 'Raving and Drooling' was just another shout, but it was a rather incoherent shout of abuse – in the way that 'Pigs' is a fairly compassionate scream of abuse, if you can scream abuse in a passionate way, just by virtue of the last lines »

« Your mother didn’t like this », Capital Radio, January 1977

17 July 1976, Opening ceremony for the new Stade Olympique at Montréal.

The same month, Dick Parry leaves London to move to Milwaukee, USA. He will come back on December to participate to the 1977 tour.

David came back to Cambridge for the summer 1976. Here on River cam, Cambridge.

AUGUST 1976

2 August 1976, Pete Watts, roadie for the Pink Floyd and father of Naomi Watts is found dead in a flat in Notting Hill, London, by heroin overdose

Daily Mirror; 3 August 1976

10 August 1976 Capitol Records test pressing on acetate of the first Unicorn work. This test press includes a different song order than appears on any Unicorn albums. Slightly different EQ on the songs. Unicorn, one of the first protégé group of David recorded.


Pat Martin (Band Unicorn):

«This is an acetate of the original finished version of One More Tomorrow produced and engineered by David Gilmour and recorded at the Floyds then brand new studio at Britannia Row, London. I sat next to David, except when I was playing bass or singing harmonies, all the way through the recording of this album. I was kind of trying to learn the ropes and the stuff I learnt came in very handy when I produced and engineered the Shed sessions. The album was totally recorded and mixed at Britannia Row and as all the Floyd's equipment was set up in the studio we got to use it. So this is Pink Floyd's equipment, set up for recording Animals, being played by the Unicorns. If you listen closely you can hear that, especially Rick's Hammond organ, it had a particular sound to it. Also Kevin used David's stage Stratocaster guitar in some sections. I used Roger's Precision bass on some stuff too»

Cited in Unicornmusic.net

21 August David Gilmour goes to see the Rolling Stones at the Knebworth Festival along Paul and Linda Mac Cartney.

Pictures by Michael Putland.

Nick Horne conducts last interviews for the future Capital Special radio

SEPTEMBER 1976

September 1976 Pink Floyd reveal to the magazine « Sounds » they have almost completed their new album.

September 1976, Tony Mitchell interviews Nick Mason at the Brittania Row Studios. The drummer are mixing the new album of tangerine Dream called « Stratosfear ». 


Edgar Froese:

« (Nick Mason) was a very nice guy and pleasant to work with. He liked our stuff a lot. But … we finalized the mix on our own »

Cited in «The greatest albums you’ll never hear» by Bruno MacDonald.

18 September 1976, Roger Waters is invited by Queen for the post-concert party at Hyde Park.

Late September, the quadrophonic mix of « Wish you were here » is completed.

OCTOBER 1976

23 october, « New Musical Express » reports more details about the new tour and of a future film commissioned to Scarfe for a budget of £100,000.

Left: « New Musical Express » article. Right: first sketches by Gerald Scarfe

NOVEMBER 1976

Early November 1976, Waters commissioned a German company for an inflatable pig in order to be displayed on stage for Pigs on the Wing song.

16 November 1976 Harry William Waters born. Nick Mason is his godfather.

Rejected project for « Animals » by Richard EVANS for Hipgnosis.

Late November 1976, Roger invited Aubrey Powell a Sunday to talking about « The Animals » sleeve. Waters is disagree with the initial projects.


Waters:

« They did a bunch of ideas for «Animals» and i didn’t like any of them »

« Special Animals », Mojo, April 2017.


Waters:

« So Dave, being Dave, said, « Well if you think you could come up with something better … » And me, being me, said, « Well I think I could … » »

« Off the wall », Mojo, December 2002.


He said to Po he wanted to shot the Battersea Power Station because he lived near and see it each time he took his cycle. He saw this building as an image of power. Followed the idea to put a inflatable pig on stage:


Waters:

« And then I had the inflatable pig idea. I was already thinking about doing the live show by that point »

« Off the wall », Mojo, December 2002.

The Battersea Power Station, 1977.

The same month, the new deal with CBS is definitely signed. Stephane Grappelli stated in the UK press he’s recently worked with Pink Floyd.

DECEMBER 1976

December 1976, dates of concert are officially announced:


«Planning became last June, when it became clear that neither Olympia nor Earl’s Court, the favored venues, were going to be available. A band that can sell 40,000 seats and still have people queuing outside all night in the rain, obviously has a limited number of places it can play».

« Welcome to the machines », Melody Maker, 26 March 1977

The technicals team works at Brittania Row facilities warehouse on the inflatables props.

3-5 December 1976 Album sleeve designers Hipgnosis arranged a three-day photo shoot at London's Battersea Power Station. With a concept suggested by Roger Waters, the team photographed a 40ft helium-filled inflatable pig floating above the power station for the cover of the new Floyd album, Animals. On the first day, the marksman who had been hired to shoot down the pig if it escaped its mooring ropes was not needed, but it took so long to inflate the pig that the photographers could only get coverage of the building. On the second day the pig was installed but broke free and sailed away; the marksman hadn't been rehired so it escaped, coming down in Kent. On the third day, Hipgnosis got their shot.


Gerald Scarfe:

« Roger telephoned to say they were shooting the « Animals » album cover and invited me along. He said it would be fun. We went to Battersea Power Station, which is half a mile down the river from where I live. « Why Battersea Power Station ? » I asked him. « I just like it » he said « I used to live near here, alongside Clapham Common, and it became part of my daily environment » 

« The making of Pink Floyd The Wall », Gerald Scarfe


« In December 1976, Pink Floyd narrowly avoided what Nick Mason jokingly calls "one of the worst aviation disasters in the history of the planet".The near-miss occurred while photographing the cover of Animals.

The band had commissioned Ballonfabrik, the German company who'd once built Zeppelin airships, tc create an inflatable pig for their next tour, and to fly over Battersea Power Station for the album sleeve. The 30-f porcine balloon was made from rubberized cotton and later nicknamed 'Algie'. Hipgnosis's Aubrey 'Po' Powell and Storm Thorgerson were tasked with organising the photoshoot.

Po took the lead, as Thorgerson was rather hurt that Waters had rejected their cover ideas for Animals "We didn't need any special permission," says Po now. "We never told the police or the authorities - jus asked the manager ofthe power station if we could fly a pig over his building." Management didn't object after all, they'd let Slade film the promo for Get Down And Get With It on the roof five years earlier.

On the day, Po and Storm had all angles covered with several photographers positioned in the power station grounds and surrounding area. As a precaution against flyaway pigs, Pink Floyd's manager, Steve O'Rourke, hired a marksman. But Algie failed to get airborne. "There wasn't enough helium," believes Nick Mason.

The team returned the following day and the pig achieved lift-off without a hitch. Po was standing with one of the photographers on Battersea Bridge, when he realised something was wrong. The hawser securing the pig had snapped: "And it just took off. Gone! I drove to where the crew and the band were, with this sense of rising panic. To add to their woes, there was no marksman.

Po recalls seeing Roger Waters with "a schoolboy look of glee on his face", before he and David Gilmour jumped into their cars and disappeared: “They couldn't wait to piss off. It was, 'You sort this out Po!"

Helicopter pilot Marc Wolff was flying one of the photographers, and alerted the authorities. "We were in radio contact with Heathrow," he says now. "Air traffic con trailers tend to be very dry, so it was hilarious having to tell them an inflatable pink pig was rising into their airspace." Wolff had previously flown combat flight operations in Vietnam, but Algie outwitted him: "It went much higher than we could, and kept disappearing into the clouds. The pig wouldn’t show up on their radar, but we had a transponder int he helicopter, so air traffic control could only track it by tracking us.

All flights into Heathrow were stopped and warnings broadcast on the radio and TV. The pol ice sent u p their own helicopter, but it also struggled to keep track of the pig, and escorted Po and Storm to their studio where they were ordered to wait by the phone. There was talk of the RAF scrambling fighter jets should the pig need shooting down. Several agonising hours later, the call came through: the pig had deflated in the cold weather and landed in a farmer's field in Kent. Po: "The phone rang and this voice in a deep country accent said, 'Are you looking for this pig? It's in my field, scaring my cows. Get down here and get rid of it »

The following day, nothing was left to chance. The marksman returned accompanied by several policemen.The shoot went off without a hitch, but when the pictures were developed Po realised, "The sky was too blue, too pristine." Fortunately, one of the photographers had shot the wonderfully doomy. Turneresque sky on the first day. "So we stripped out the pig and pasted it into the photo from day one," admits Po. "All that money wasted. But there'd been headlines in all the papers-'Pig Ahoy!' It was the best publicity Pink Floyd could have had »

« Special Animals », Mojo, April 2017


Storm Thorgerson:

« Perhaps our most publicized fiasco at Hipgnosis Design was the Great Pig Escape, early 1977. Pink Floyd had rejected our suggestion for their ANIMALS cover in favor of Roger Waters' idea of a pig hovering over Battersea Power Station. Despite serious misgivings about such a notion (shades of Monty Python and the Goodies -- was it not intrinsically silly?) we offered to shoot the pictures and put the cover together. Contrary to our advice the band didn't want the pig "stripped in" which would allow us to photograph the pig anywhere, but wanted it shot for real, the pig actually floating above the power station. Thus the forty foot zeppelin was crated to London and assembled on location. 

«The Work of Hipgnosis: Walk Away Rene », Storm Thorgerson, 1978.


« It was a slow news day so I telephoned the Yard. “Sorry, there is very little crime about”. I grunted and wondered whether to write out my expenses. “I can offer you a flying pink pig if you like.” I grunted again. “I see those every morining”, I said.” “Really. There’s a flying pink pig loose at 7,000 feet and it’s causing a hazard to aircraft.”

I told him to look at his calendar. “There are months to go before April 1”, I said. Twenty minutes later I decided to ring someone else at the Yard. “Not much about I’m afraid unless you’re interested in a flying pink pig”, he said, and laughed. “Do you want me to tell you about it?” I knew I was not going to get any peace until he did. “At 10:25 this morning a pink pig balloon measuring 10 metres by five meters, escapedl from its mooring in the car park of Battersea power station. It was there to advertise the pop group, Pink Floyd, but it broke loose. “One of our helicopters on traffic patrol intercepted a radio message from a light aircraft to the control tower at Heathrow airport. The pilot was heard to say: I’ve just been overtaken by a pink elephant at 7,000 feet. “The helicopter crew offered to help because the control tower could not plot the creature on their radar.” He paused. “Don’t tell me you chased it”, I said in disbelief. “No, we escorted it across London as far as Crystal Palace. Now it’s out of our area”, he said regretfully. At noon the helium balloon was 20 miles east of London over the Essex suburbs and the Civil Aviation Authority was also infected by mirth. Later police in Essex reported: “It’s at about 5,000 feet and seems to be coming down. It must be getting hungry.” I groaned. I gave up grunting when I realized the significance of the noise. By mid-afternoon the pig was 18,000 feet above Chatham, and gave every appearance of heading home to Germany, where it was made. But several hours later it became deflated and subsided disconsolately on to a farm at Chilham, near Canterbury ». 

« Slow Day for News Until a Pink Pig Took Wing », Times du 4 décembre 1976

Storm Thorgerson:

« Day 1. Still camera crew of eleven positioned at all good vantage points, plus eight man film crew, helicopter, roadies, group and manager, and one marksman with telescopic rifle to gun down the Pig in case it should escape and fall on someone's noggin (an insurance problem). Much puffing and blowing, many gas cylinders etc. but the pig was not launched. A beautifully moody sky, perfect photographic conditions, apart from being a bit chilly.

Day 2. Eleven still cameramen, eight man film crew, helicopter, one or two of the group, manager but no marksman (?). Pig launched successfully on bright clear morning. Hauled slowly up side of building, everyone snapping away. Near the top, betwixt the towers, a fateful gust of wind. The pig turned suddenly, broke mooring cable and lurched rapidly towards the heavens. No one had told the marksman to return. The pig sailed away and was lost from sight in five minutes. Absolute horrors. All that time and money and it had simply disappeared in front of our eyes. The police trailed it to thirty thousand feet and then gave up, the cowards. That evening, the dirigible came down on a Kent farm. The farmer was reported to have said he thought it "a bit unusual"! Actually the Press made a bundle out of the whole thing: "flying pig interrupts international flight patterns," "weird UFO spotted," "flying pig heads for home" (it was made in Holland). But the Floyd don't give up that easily and the roadies rescued it from Kent, repaired the puncture and we started again.

Day 3. Only four or five still photographers this time, plus depleted film crew but everything went really well. Pig stayed in position perfectly and everyone clicked away, the helicopter zoomed about, and we were all delighted.

The band were equally delighted. The material, movie and still, was fine (as it should've been after three whole days), but there was a snag. As if the whole event hadn't been enough of a fiasco, and very funny at that, it transpired that the band liked the sky and power station from Day 1 (but there was no pig) and the pig from Day 3, but the sky was boring. Well, well. What could we do but strip it in after all? Pig from Day 3 dropped into sky of Day 1 and retouched. It is true that we were seen to smile somewhat when they decided to do that.

« The Work of Hipgnosis: Walk Away Rene », Storm Thorgerson, 1978.

The band rehearsing at Olympia Hall of London


Roger Waters

« Because we'd been rehearsing for the show, the live show - we're doing the whole of « Wish you were here » in the second half of the live show. I've listened to it quite a lot recently and the only thing that worries me about the album Wish you were here is the same thing that worried me when we'd finished it. It worried me quite a lot when we were doing it. And that is the very drawn out nature of the... overture "bits" that go on and on and on and on. It's 12 minutes I think before there's a voice in it, which I think was a mistake. I thought it was a mistake then and I was constantly trying to cut out things. But it's very difficult you see because you get something and get to like phrases, guitar phrases in the solo or something, or bits of Moog or something, and you get - you grow to like things. It's very hard to cut things out once you've got them down. I think we made a basic error in not arranging it in a different way so that some of the ideas were expanded lyrically before they were developed musically »

« Your Mother didn't like this (Part 5) », Capital Radio, 1976


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